Science

August 19, 2019 - 5:37 pm
Andrew Hooper's wife had warned him about getting too close to an Alaska glacier. She wasn't pleased, he said, when he returned from a kayaking trip earlier this month soaked to the bone but with incredible footage of part of the giant glacier's sudden and dramatic collapse. "It was absolutely...
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A man stops on his way to the top of what once was the Okjokull glacier, in Iceland, Sunday, Aug. 18, 2019. With poetry, moments of silence and political speeches about the urgent need to fight climate change, Icelandic officials, activists and others bade goodbye to the first Icelandic glacier to disappear. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
August 18, 2019 - 1:34 pm
OKJOKULL GLACIER, Iceland (AP) — It was a funeral for ice. With poetry, moments of silence and political speeches about the urgent need to fight climate change, Icelandic officials, activists and others bade goodbye to what once was a glacier. Icelandic geologist Oddur Sigurðsson pronounced the...
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File- Picture taken on March 5, 2019 shows a black rhinoceros in the savannah landscape of the Etosha National Park. ( Matthias Toedt/AP via AP)
August 17, 2019 - 4:33 pm
GENEVA (AP) — From guitars to traditional medicines and from tusk to tail, mankind's exploitation of the planet's fauna and flora is putting some of them at risk of extinction. Representatives of some 180 nations are meeting in Geneva to agree on protections for vulnerable species, taking up issues...
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Junar Lim takes photos of Ziah Lim, left, and Arsenia Lim, all of Cavite, the Philippines, at gardens in Town Square in Anchorage, Alaska, Thursday, Aug. 15, 2019. Alaska recorded its warmest month ever in July and hot, dry weather has continued in Anchorage and much of the region south of the Alaska Range. (AP Photo/Dan Joling)
August 17, 2019 - 10:57 am
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska has been America's canary in the coal mine for climate warming, and the yellow bird is swooning. July was Alaska's warmest month ever, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Sea ice melted. Bering Sea fish swam in above-normal temperatures...
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Junar Lim takes photos of Ziah Lim, left, and Arsenia Lim, all of Cavite, the Philippines, at gardens in Town Square in Anchorage, Alaska, Thursday, Aug. 15, 2019. Alaska recorded its warmest month ever in July and hot, dry weather has continued in Anchorage and much of the region south of the Alaska Range. (AP Photo/Dan Joling)
August 17, 2019 - 10:49 am
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska has been America's canary in the coal mine for climate warming, and the yellow bird is swooning. July was Alaska's warmest month ever, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Sea ice melted. Bering Sea fish swam in above-normal temperatures...
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FILE - In this Thursday, May 23, 2019, file photo, an official of the Department of Marine and Coastal Resources feeds sea-grass spread to Marium, baby dugong lost from her mom in Libong island, Trang province, southern Thailand. The 8-month-old dugong nurtured by marine experts after it was found near a beach in southern Thailand has died of what biologists believe was a combination of shock and ingesting plastic waste. The female dugong - a large ocean mammal - became a hit in Thailand after images of biologists embracing and feeding her with milk and sea grass spread across social media. Last week, she was found bruised after being chased and supposedly attacked by a male dugong during the mating season. (Sirachai Arunrugstichai via AP, File)
August 17, 2019 - 5:59 am
BANGKOK (AP) — An 8-month-old dugong nurtured by marine experts after it was found lost near a beach in southern Thailand has died of what biologists believe was a combination of shock and ingesting plastic waste, officials said Saturday. The female dugong — a large ocean mammal — was named "Marium...
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In this Aug. 8, 2019 photo, Jeff Pietro, a senior engineer assistant for Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute in Massachusetts, helps move the anchoring system for a microphone, at it is being lowered over the side of the ship in the Santa Barbara Channel off Southern California. The system, sponsored by the Benioff Ocean Initiative at University of California, Santa Barbara, will allow the scientists to inform ships about the presence of whales in the area. (Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times via AP)
August 16, 2019 - 2:17 pm
SANTA BARBARA, Calif. (AP) — Scientists have installed an underwater sound system they hope will reduce collisions between whales and ships in the Santa Barbara Channel off Southern California. A listening station on the channel floor is able to capture whale calls as far away as 30 miles (48...
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In this Thursday, Aug. 1, 2019, photo, evidence of a Cascadia earthquake's awesome destructive power is visible at the beach in Neskowin, Ore. A "ghost forest" of Sitka spruces juts up from the beach in the tiny town. The trees were likely buried by tsunami debris 2,000 years earlier, and partially uncovered by storms in 1997. (AP Photo/Andrew Selsky)
August 16, 2019 - 8:30 am
NEWPORT, Ore. (AP) — With sunlight sparkling off surrounding Yaquina Bay, workers are putting up an ocean-studies building, smack in the middle of an area expected to one day be hit by a tsunami. Experts say it's only a matter of time before a shift in a major fault line off the Oregon coast causes...
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Virgin Galactic ground crew guide the company's carrier plane into the hangar at Spaceport America following a test flight over the desert near Upham, New Mexico, on Thursday, Aug. 15, 2019. The carrier plane is now permanently based at the spaceport after arriving earlier this week. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan)
August 15, 2019 - 7:13 pm
UPHAM, N.M. (AP) — Spaceport America is no longer just a shiny shell of hope that space tourism would one day launch from this remote spot in the New Mexico desert. The once-empty hangar that anchors the taxpayer-financed launch and landing facility has been transformed into a custom-tailored...
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This March 26, 2019 photo shows the water level of the Colorado River, as seen from the Hoover Dam, Ariz. For the seven states that rely on the Colorado River that carries snowmelt from the Rocky Mountains to the Gulf of California, that means a future with increasingly less water for farms and cities although climate scientists say it's hard to predict how much less. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation on Thursday, Aug. 15, 2019, will release its projections for next year's supply from Lake Mead, which feeds Nevada, Arizona and California. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)
August 15, 2019 - 1:20 pm
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Snow swamped mountains across the U.S. West last winter, leaving enough to thrill skiers into the summer, swelling rivers and streams when it melted, and largely making wildfire restrictions unnecessary. But the wet weather can be misleading. Climate change means the region...
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