WHO Warns COVID-19 Pandemic May Get ‘Worse and Worse and Worse’

Johnny Lopez
July 14, 2020 - 3:40 pm

    The World Health Organization has issued a dire warning as the coronavirus pandemic continues to spread around the world.

    With nearly 13 million recorded cases of the COVID-19 globally and nearly half a million deaths since the start of the outbreak, WHO Director General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said the novel virus will continue to spread unless countries and individuals take precautionary steps to stem the transmission.

    “Let me be blunt, too many countries are headed in the wrong direction. The virus remains public enemy number one,” Tedros said, reported The Hill. “If basics are not followed, the only way this pandemic is going to go. It is going to get worse and worse and worse.”

    "There will be no return to the old normal for the foreseeable future. But there is a roadmap to a situation where we can control the disease and get on with our lives,” Tedros added.

    "We need to reach a sustainable situation where we do have adequate control of this virus without shutting down our lives entirely, or lurching from lockdown to lockdown.”

    According to CNBC, the United States and Brazil are responsible for half of the new daily coronavirus cases. On Sunday, the two nations accounted for 111,319 COVID-19 cases.

    Without naming anyone specifically, Tedros addressed the “mixed messages” of some government leaders.

    “The only aim of the virus is to find people to infect,” he said. “Mixed messages from leaders are undermining the most critical ingredient of any response: Trust.”

    Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease specialist, has said a COVID-19 vaccine could be avaible by early next year.

    “There are multiple candidates that are in various stages of clinical trial,” Fauci said. “One or two of them will go into phase three of efficacy literally at the end of this month.”

    As of Tuesday, the U.S. has confirmed a total of 3, 397, 069 cases of coronavirus, with at least 136, 117 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins.

    LISTEN NOW on the RADIO.COM App
    Follow RADIO.COM
    Facebook | Twitter | Instagram