Health

This March 2019 image shows part of the health advice option in a 23andme genetic test. But Isaac Kohane, a biomedical researcher at Harvard, said research in the field is still limited and that there’s little evidence any small effects from genetic variations can be translated into meaningful dietary advice. (AP Photo)
March 25, 2019 - 8:30 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Avoid fast food, eat vegetables and exercise. It sounds like generic health advice, but they're tips supposedly tailored to my DNA profile. The suggestions come from 23andme, one of the companies offering to point you toward the optimal eating and exercise habits for your genetics...
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In this Jan. 17, 2007 file photo, California-grown avocados are for sale at a market in Mountain View, Calif. Henry Avocado, a grower and distributor based near San Diego, said Saturday, March 23, 2019, they are voluntarily recalling their California grown "Henry" labeled whole avocados distributed across the U.S. over possible listeria contamination. Henry Avocado says it issued the voluntary recall after a routine inspection of its packing plant revealed samples that tested positive for listeria. The company says avocados imported from Mexico and distributed by Henry are not being recalled and are safe. There have been no reports of any illnesses associated with the items. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma, File)
March 24, 2019 - 1:37 pm
ESCONDIDO, Calif. (AP) — A Southern California company is voluntarily recalling whole avocados over possible listeria contamination. Henry Avocado, a grower and distributor based near San Diego, said Saturday that the recall covers conventional and organic avocados grown and packed in California...
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FILE - This Dec. 11, 2006 file photo shows a silicone gel breast implant in Irving, Texas. U.S. health officials are taking another look at the safety of breast implants, the latest review in a decades-long debate. At a two-day meeting that starts Monday, March 25, 2019, a panel of experts for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration will hear from researchers, plastic surgeons and implant makers, as well as from women who believe their ailments were caused by the implants. (AP Photo/Donna McWilliam, File)
March 24, 2019 - 7:27 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health officials are taking another look at the safety of breast implants, the latest review in a decades-long debate. Experts for the Food and Drug Administration will hear from researchers, plastic surgeons and implant makers at a two-day meeting that starts Monday. Women...
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Susy Solis
March 20, 2019 - 6:51 pm
DALLAS (1080 KRLD) - We've all heard of the benefits of drinking hot tea but a new study says if it's too hot, it could significantly raise your risk of esophageal cancer, according to the American Cancer Society. Researchers looked at more than 50,000 people over 10 years. What made this study...
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Measles
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Kelli Wiese
March 20, 2019 - 5:33 pm
SAN ANTONIO (1080 KRLD) - The state's 13th measles case is reported in Bexar County. The San Antonio Metropolitan Health District says this case is associated with the case of measles from Guadalupe County reported by the Texas Department of State Health Services on March 6. The last recorded case...
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FILE - In this Jan. 16, 2019 file photo, Andrew Wheeler is shown at a Senate Environment and Public Works Committee hearing to be the administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Wheeler is telling CBS News in an interview airing Wednesday morning that climate change is “an important issue,” but that most of the threats it poses are “50 to 75 years out.” (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
March 20, 2019 - 7:30 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Environmental Protection Agency's new administrator says unsafe drinking water is "probably the biggest environmental threat" the world faces. Andrew Wheeler told CBS News in an interview airing Wednesday climate change is "an important issue" but most of the threats it poses...
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FILE- In this Sept. 21, 2018 file photo customers look at Apple Watches at an Apple store in New York. A huge study suggests the Apple Watch sometimes can detect a worrisome irregular heartbeat. But experts say more work is needed to tell if using wearable technology to screen for heart problems really helps. (AP Photo/Patrick Sison, File)
March 16, 2019 - 4:57 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A huge study suggests the Apple Watch can detect a worrisome irregular heartbeat at least sometimes — but experts say more work is needed to tell if using wearable technology to screen for heart problems really helps. More than 419,000 Apple Watch users signed up for the unusual...
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