National News

FILE - In this April 4, 2013, file photo, a truck carrying 250 tons of coal hauls the fuel to the surface of the Spring Creek mine near Decker, Mont. Federal officials say the Trump administration's decision to lift a moratorium on coal sales from public lands could hasten the release of more than 5 billion tons of greenhouse gasses. The report comes after a court ruled last month that the administration failed to consider the environmental effects of its resumption in 2017 of coal sales. A moratorium had been imposed under President Barack Obama over worries about climate change. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown, File)
May 22, 2019 - 8:23 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — The Trump administration's decision to lift a moratorium on coal sales from public lands could hasten the release of more than 5 billion tons of greenhouse gases, but officials concluded Wednesday it would make little difference in overall U.S. climate emissions. That...
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Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan speaks to reporters after a classified briefing for members of Congress on Iran, Tuesday, May 21, 2019, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
May 22, 2019 - 5:59 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Pentagon on Thursday will present plans to the White House to send up to 10,000 more troops to the Middle East, in a move to beef up defenses against potential Iranian threats, U.S. officials said Wednesday. The officials said no final decision has been made yet, and it's not...
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President Donald Trump awards Sgt. Thomas Avila III of the Azusa (Calif.) Police Department the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, May 22, 2019. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
May 22, 2019 - 5:18 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Fourteen public safety officers were awarded the Medal of Valor by President Donald Trump on Wednesday, including eight who responded to a shooting at a southern California polling place. "Every officer, firefighter and first responder who receives this award embodies the highest...
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FILE - In this Feb. 2, 2019 file photo, Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam, left, gestures as his wife, Pam, listens during a news conference in the Governors Mansion at the Capitol in Richmond, Va. A law firm has completed its investigation into how a racist photo appeared on a yearbook page for Northam. Eastern Virginia Medical School said in a statement Tuesday, May 21 that the findings of the investigation will be announced at a press conference on Wednesday, May 22. Northam's profile in the 1984 yearbook includes a photo of a man in blackface standing next to someone in Ku Klux Klan clothing. Northam denies being in the photo, which nearly ended his political career in February. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)
May 22, 2019 - 3:41 pm
NORFOLK, Va. (AP) — The mystery of whether Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam was in the racist yearbook photo that nearly destroyed his career remains unsolved. A monthslong investigation ordered up by Eastern Virginia Medical School failed to determine whether Northam is in the picture published in 1984...
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FILE- In this Feb. 9, 2019 file photo, a sign bearing the company logo is displayed outside a Tesla store in Cherry Creek Mall in Denver. A new automatic lane-change feature of Tesla’s Autopilot system doesn’t work well and could be a safety risk to drivers, according to tests performed by Consumer Reports. Senior Director of Auto Testing Jake Fisher said in a statement Wednesday, May 22, that the system doesn’t appear to react to brake lights or turn signals, and it can’t anticipate what other drivers will do. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)
May 22, 2019 - 2:59 pm
DETROIT (AP) — A new automatic lane-change feature of Tesla's Autopilot system doesn't work well and could be a safety risk to drivers, according to tests performed by Consumer Reports. The magazine and website tested "Navigate on Autopilot" and found it less competent than human drivers, cutting...
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FILE - American John Walker Lindh is seen in this undated file photo obtained Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2002, from a religious school where he studied for five months in Bannu, 304 kilometers (190 miles) southwest of Islamabad, Pakistan. Lindh, the young Californian who became known as the American Taliban after he was captured by U.S. forces in the invasion of Afghanistan in late 2001, is set to go free Thursday, May 23, 2019, after nearly two decades in prison. (AP Photo, File)
May 22, 2019 - 2:54 pm
ALEXANDRIA, Va. (AP) — John Walker Lindh, the young Californian who became known as the American Taliban after he was captured by U.S. forces in the invasion of Afghanistan in late 2001, is set to go free after nearly two decades in prison. But conditions imposed recently on Lindh's release, slated...
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President Trump
(AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)
May 22, 2019 - 11:52 am
President Donald Trump abruptly quit a meeting with congressional Democrats Wednesday with a flat declaration he would no longer work with them unless they drop their investigations in the aftermath of the Trump-Russia report.
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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., listens as Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., speaks during a news conference at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, May 14, 2019. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
May 20, 2019 - 4:13 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, whose home state of Kentucky was long one of the nation's leading tobacco producers, introduced bipartisan legislation Monday to raise the minimum age for buying any tobacco products from 18 to 21. The chamber's top Republican, who said he...
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May 20, 2019 - 4:12 pm
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — In a story May 18 about a student who brought a gun to a school in Portland, Oregon, The Associated Press based on information from police reported erroneously the name of a person authorities say was tackled after bringing the weapon into a classroom. The student was Angel...
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FILE - In this May 5, 2015 photo, marijuana plants grow at a Minnesota Medical Solutions greenhouse in Otsego, Minn. Advocates for legalizing marijuana have long argued it would strike a blow for social justice after a decades-long drug war that disproportionately targeted minority and poor communities. (Glen Stubbe/Star Tribune via AP, File)
May 19, 2019 - 12:13 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Advocates for legalizing marijuana have long argued it would strike a blow for social justice after a decades-long drug war that disproportionately targeted minority and poor communities. But social equity has been both a sticking point and selling point this year in New York and...
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