Agriculture regulation

In this photo taken Thursday, March 19, 2020, farm worker Evans Makori pulls a handcart of roses to be thrown away at Maridadi Flowers farm in Naivasha, Kenya. With lockdowns and border restrictions around the world because of the coronavirus, the multibillion dollar flower industry in countries such as Kenya and the Netherlands has slumped. For many people the new coronavirus pandemic causes mild or moderate symptoms but for some it can cause severe illness.(AP Photo/Patrick Ngugi)
March 20, 2020 - 4:17 am
LISSE, Netherlands (AP) — The pots of chrysanthemums stacked in Henk van der Slot’s barn in the Netherlands bulb fields were supposed to decorate St. Peter’s Square at the Vatican over Easter. But with border restrictions and lockdowns spreading around the globe as governments fight the coronavirus...
Read More
Students line up in the cafeteria for lunch at Lincoln High School in Dallas, Friday, March 13, 2020. During the coming extended spring break school closures, this cafeteria and a few others in the Dallas Independent School District will be providing lunches to students despite the closure of the school. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
March 14, 2020 - 12:04 am
ELK GROVE, Calif. (AP) — Kiyana Esco needs free school lunches and breakfasts to feed her six children. But with schools shutting down over coronavirus concerns, she’s scrambling to pick up the meals, care for her kids and keep her job. Esco, a single mother who was just promoted to manager at a...
Read More
Democratic candidate for U.S. Senate Mike Espy, speaks to reporters about voting in the party primary, in Ridgeland, Miss., Tuesday, March 10, 2020. Espy, a former congressman and former U.S. agriculture secretary, faces two opponents in the party primary. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)
March 10, 2020 - 8:22 pm
JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Former U.S. Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy won the Democratic nomination for a U.S. Senate seat in Mississippi on Tuesday, setting up a rematch with Republican Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith, an outspoken ally of President Donald Trump. Republicans hold most major offices in...
Read More
Jessica Baker takes a cutting of a plant at the Baker's marijuana nursery at Baker Medical, Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2020, in Oklahoma City. When voters in conservative Oklahoma approved medical marijuana in 2018, many thought the rollout would be ploddingly slow and burdened with bureaucracy. Instead, business is booming so much cannabis industry workers and entrepreneurs are moving to Oklahoma from states with more well-established pot cultures, like California, Colorado and Oregon. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
March 07, 2020 - 9:20 am
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — From their keen taste for sun-ripened pot to their first meeting at a pro-marijuana rally in college in the 1990s, everything about Chip and Jessica Baker fits the stereotype of cannabis country in Northern California, where they lived for 20 years. Jessica, with wavy hair that...
Read More
Serb member of the tripartite Presidency of Bosnia and Herzegovina Milorad Dodik, right, gestures during a parade marking the 28th anniversary of the Republic of Srpska in Banja Luka, Bosnia, Tuesday, Jan. 7, 2020. Bosnia's Serbs celebrated on Thursday their self-declared holiday that has been disputed as discriminatory by the country's other ethnic groups and its top court. (AP Photo/Radivoje Pavicic)
February 20, 2020 - 6:50 am
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina (AP) — The Bosnian Serb leader on Thursday renewed calls for Bosnia’s dissolution and pledges to block decision-making in the country’s institutions, in a move slammed by Western envoys as a challenge to the U.S.-sponsored peace agreement that ended Bosnia’s civil war...
Read More
January 30, 2020 - 1:41 am
BERLIN (AP) — Leaders of Germany's governing coalition agreed Thursday to provide 1 billion euros ($1.1 billion) over four years to help farmers as they adapt to new environmental regulations. The decision to provide the money for environmental programs and investment emerged from a late-night...
Read More
FILE - In this Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018, file photo, an egret looks for food along Valhalla Pond in Riverview, Fla. The Trump administration was expected to announce completion as soon as Thursday, Jan. 23, 2020, of one of its most momentous environmental rollbacks, removing federal protections for millions of miles of the country’s streams, arroyos and wetlands. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara, File)
January 23, 2020 - 12:23 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration lifted federal protections Thursday for some of the nation's millions of miles of streams, arroyos and wetlands, completing one of its most far-reaching environmental rollbacks. The changes will scale back which waterways qualify for protection against...
Read More
FILE - In this April 23, 2018, file photo, Trevor Eubanks, plant manager for Big Top Farms, shovels dried hemp as branches hang drying in barn rafters overhead at their production facility near Sisters, Ore. Draft rules released by the United States Department of Agriculture for a new and booming agricultural hemp industry have alarmed farmers, processors and retailers across the country, who say the provisions will be crippling if they are not significantly overhauled before they become final. (AP Photo/Don Ryan, File)
January 13, 2020 - 6:22 pm
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Hemp growers and entrepreneurs who were joyous a year ago after U.S. lawmakers reclassified the plant as a legal agricultural crop now are worried their businesses could be crippled if federal policymakers move ahead with draft regulations. Licenses for hemp cultivation topped...
Read More
January 13, 2020 - 12:03 am
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Hemp growers and entrepreneurs who were joyous a year ago after U.S. lawmakers reclassified the plant as a legal agricultural crop now are worried their businesses could be crippled if federal policymakers move ahead with draft regulations. Licenses for hemp cultivation topped...
Read More
In this Nov. 5, 2019 photo, in St. Francis, Wis., Amy Carter looks at her Yorkshire terrier-Chihuahua mix Bentley, who has epilepsy. Carter, gives him CBD, which she says has reduced his seizures. The federal government has yet to establish standards for CBD that will help pet owners know whether it works and how much to give. But the lack of regulation has not stopped some from buying it, fueling a $400 million CBD market for pets that grew more than tenfold since last year and is expected to reach $1.7 billion by 2023, according to the cannabis research firm Brightfield Group. (AP Photo/Carrie Antlfinger)
Associated Press
January 07, 2020 - 10:16 am
Companies have unleashed hundreds of CBD pet health products accompanied by glowing customer testimonials claiming the cannabis derivative produced calmer, quieter and pain-free dogs and cats. But some of these products are all bark and no bite. “You'd be astounded by the analysis we've seen of...
Read More

Pages