Atmospheric science

President Donald Trump speaks as he meets with Austrian Chancellor Sebastian Kurz in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2019. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
February 20, 2019 - 6:51 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration is exploring the idea of forming a special committee to look at climate change and security risks, with the effort being coordinated by a 79-year-old physicist who rejects mainstream climate science. A "discussion paper" obtained by The Associated Press...
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FILE - In this Nov. 21, 2008, file photo, Wallace Smith Broecker, a professor in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Columbia University in New York, addresses the audience during the Balzan prize ceremony in Rome. Broecker, a climate scientist who popularized the term "global warming," has died. He was 87. Columbia University said the longtime professor and researcher died Monday, Feb. 18, 2019, at a New York City hospital. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)
February 18, 2019 - 4:12 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A climate scientist who popularized the term "global warming" has died. Wallace Smith Broecker was 87. Columbia University said the longtime professor and researcher died Monday at a New York City hospital. A spokesman for the university's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory said...
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Kevin Tovornik exits his travel camper located in the back yard of his home damaged by flooding from Hurricane Florence near the Crabtree Swamp Friday, Feb. 1, 2019, in Conway, S.C. Tovornik lost his air conditioner and duct work in the 2016 flood. In 2018, he saved his furniture, but still ended up losing the house.
February 16, 2019 - 6:02 pm
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — When he took the job 15 years ago, Horry County Emergency Manager Randy Webster figured his biggest disasters would be wind and surge rolling over his county's beaches, South Carolina's top tourist destination. Instead, his worries have shifted inland, where rivers overflowing...
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FI LE - In this June 17, 2018, file photo, man fishes from the Battery City Park esplanade as temperature edge near 90 degrees in New York. The weather in New York City in a few decades will feel like how Arkansas is now. Chicago will seem like Kansas City and San Francisco will get a Southern California climate if global warming pollution continues at the current pace, a new study finds. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)
February 12, 2019 - 11:03 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The climate in New York City in 60 years could feel like Arkansas now. Chicago could seem like Kansas City and San Francisco could get a Southern California climate if global warming pollution continues at the current pace, a new study finds. In 2080, North Carolina's capital,...
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This map made available by NASA in February 2019 shows global surface temperature anomalies for 2014-2018. Higher than normal temperatures are shown in red and lower than normal temperatures are shown in blue. Two U.S. agencies, the United Kingdom Met Office and the World Meteorological Organization analyzed global temperatures in slightly different ways, but each came to the same conclusion on Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2019: 2018 was the fourth-warmest year on record behind 2016, 2015 and 2017. (Kathryn Mersmann/NASA - Scientific Visualization Studio via AP)
February 06, 2019 - 1:51 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — While 2018 was the fourth-warmest year on record, British meteorologists are predicting the next five years will be much hotter, maybe even record-breaking. Two U.S. agencies, the United Kingdom Met Office and the World Meteorological Organization analyzed global temperatures in...
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FILE - In this Monday, Feb. 22, 2016 file photo, trekkers pass through a glacier at the Mount Everest base camp, Nepal. One-third of Himalayan glaciers will melt by the end of the century due to climate change, threatening water sources for 1.9 billion people, even if current efforts to reduce climate change succeed, according to an assessment released Monday, Feb. 4, 2019. by the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development. (AP Photo/Tashi Sherpa, file)
February 05, 2019 - 6:39 pm
KATHMANDU, Nepal (AP) — One-third of Himalayan glaciers will melt by the end of the century due to climate change, threatening water sources for 1.9 billion people, even if current efforts to reduce climate change succeed, an assessment warns. If global efforts to curb climate change fail, the...
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People walk through a snowstorm in downtown Jackson, Mich., Monday, Jan. 28, 2019. (J. Scott Park/Jackson Citizen Patriot via AP)
January 28, 2019 - 4:02 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — It might seem counterintuitive, but the dreaded polar vortex is bringing its icy grip to parts of the U.S. thanks to a sudden blast of warm air in the Arctic. Get used to it. The polar vortex has been wandering more often in recent years. It all started with misplaced Moroccan...
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FILE - In this Saturday, Aug. 4, 2018 file photo, people cool off in a fountain during a hot summer day in the Basque city of Vitoria, northern Spain. In 2018, 29 countries and Antarctica had record hot years, says Berkeley Earth climate scientist Zeke Hausfather. (AP Photo/Alvaro Barrientos)
January 24, 2019 - 2:29 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — While Earth was a tad cooler last year than the last couple of years, it still was the fourth warmest on record, a new analysis shows. With the partial U.S. government shutdown, federal agency calculations for last year's temperatures are delayed. But independent scientists at...
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FILE - This Sept. 26, 2018 file photo provided by the National Park Service shows a 4-year-old female gray wolf emerging from her cage at Isle Royale National Park in Michigan. Environmental research projects on endangered animals and air and water quality are being delayed and disrupted by the monthlong partial federal government shutdown and not just those conducted by government agencies. (National Park Service via AP, File)
January 24, 2019 - 10:38 am
The rainwater collection system is broken at the environmental research station on a remote, rocky Pacific island off the California coast. So is a crane used to hoist small boats in and out of the water. A two-year supply of diesel fuel for the power generators is almost gone. U.S. Fish and...
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FILE - In this Dec. 13, 2017, file photo, Toyota Motor Corporation President Akio Toyoda, left, and Panasonic Corporation President Kazuhiro Tsuga, right, pose for photographers after a joint press conference in Tokyo. Toyota Motor Corp. and Panasonic Corp. said in a joint statement Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2019, they are setting up a joint venture to research, manufacture and sell batteries for ecological autos, an increasingly lucrative sector amid concerns about global warming. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko, File)
January 22, 2019 - 3:21 am
TOKYO (AP) — Toyota Motor Corp. and Panasonic Corp. are setting up a joint venture to research, manufacture and sell batteries for ecological autos, an increasingly lucrative sector amid concerns about global warming. The Japanese automaker and the Japanese electronics maker said in a joint...
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