Butterflies

Monarch Butterfly
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Barbara Schwarz
February 20, 2019 - 4:23 pm
Butterfly Center Caught In Limbo.mp3 Heavy construction equipment sits outside the National Butterfly Center in far South Texas, ready to build the border wall. The spending bill signed by president Trump exempted the center along with some other South Texas landmarks, but then came the president's...
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A Monarch butterfly rests on the finger of a woman in the Amanalco de Becerra sanctuary, on the mountains near the extinct Nevado de Toluca volcano, in Mexico, Thursday, Feb. 14, 2019. The monarch butterfly population, like that of other insects, fluctuates widely depending on a variety of factors, but scientists say the recoveries after each big dip tend to be smaller, suggesting an overall declining trend. (AP Photo/ Marco Ugarte)
February 15, 2019 - 2:43 pm
AMANALCO DE BECERRA, Mexico (AP) — For years, park rangers and conservationists working around Mexico's Nevado de Toluca volcano chased rumors of a monarch butterfly colony that wintered high in a forest of oyamel firs in some corner of the 132,000-acre (53,419-hectare) national reserve. Local...
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FILE- In this Aug. 19, 2015 photo, Tom Merriman stands behind a monarch in his butterfly atrium at his nursery in Vista, Calif. Researchers with an environmental group are labeling as "disturbingly low" the number of western monarch butterflies that migrate along the California coast. A recent count by the Xerces Society recorded fewer than 30,000 butterflies, which it says is an 86 percent decline since 2017. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull, File)
January 06, 2019 - 2:27 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Researchers with an environmental group have labeled as "disturbingly low" the number of western monarch butterflies that migrate along the California coast. A recent count by the Xerces Society recorded fewer than 30,000 butterflies, which it said is an 86 percent decline...
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FILE - In this May 26, 2010 file photo, a Coccinellidae, more commonly known as a ladybug or ladybird beetle, rests on the petals of a rose in Portland, Ore. A study estimates a 14 percent decline in ladybugs in the United States and Canada from 1987 to 2006. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)
September 20, 2018 - 12:06 am
OXFORD, Pa. (AP) — A staple of summer — swarms of bugs — seems to be a thing of the past. And that's got scientists worried. Pesky mosquitoes, disease-carrying ticks, crop-munching aphids and cockroaches are doing just fine. But the more beneficial flying insects of summer — native bees, moths,...
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