Child and teen health

FILE - This undated photo released by the Metropolitan Police of London, shows Shamima Begum, a young British woman who went to Syria to join the Islamic State group and now wants to return to Britain. During an interview, Tuesday, March 5, 2019, in Sunamganu, Bangladesh, Begum's father, Ahmed Ali, said his daughter’s citizenship should not be canceled and that she could be punished in the United Kingdom if it was determined she had committed a crime. (Metropolitan Police of London via AP, File)
March 08, 2019 - 2:35 pm
LONDON (AP) — There were conflicting reports Friday about the newborn son of a U.K.-born teenager who left her London home to join the Islamic State group in Syria, after the mother's lawyer said the boy was reported to have died. Lawyer Tasnime Akunjee tweeted that he has "strong but as yet...
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Ethan Lindenberger testifies during a Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March 5, 2019, to examine vaccines, focusing on preventable disease outbreaks. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
March 05, 2019 - 8:00 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — An Ohio teen defied his mother's anti-vaccine beliefs and started getting his shots when he turned 18 — and told Congress on Tuesday that it's crucial to counter fraudulent claims on social media that scare parents. Ethan Lindenberger of Norwalk, Ohio, said his mother's "love,...
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March 01, 2019 - 3:01 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Congressional Democrats are trying to increase pressure on Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta over his handling of a secret plea deal with a wealthy financier accused of sexually abusing dozens of underage girls. A group of House Democrats sent a letter to the attorney general on...
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FILE - This Aug. 9, 2018, file photo, provided by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, shows a scene from a tour of South Texas Family Residential Center in Dilley, Texas. Months after the Trump administration ended the general policy of separating parents and children, advocates and members of Congress are questioning the treatment of children who cross the U.S.-Mexico border with other relatives - grandparents, uncles and aunts, and adult siblings. (Charles Reed/U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement via AP, File)
February 21, 2019 - 12:06 am
HOUSTON (AP) — Months after the Trump administration announced an end to its widescale separation of migrant parents and children, the policy remains a heated issue in the courts and at the border as critics contend the government is still needlessly breaking up immigrant families. The Texas Civil...
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February 14, 2019 - 5:31 pm
A study finds strong evidence that anesthesia during a short surgery doesn't hurt a baby's brain development. The research can't answer broader safety questions about repeated or prolonged anesthesia. But it's reassuring for parents whose children face a single, uncomplicated surgery. Anesthesia...
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U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps Commander Jonathan White testifies during the House Commerce Oversight and Investigations Subcommittee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Feb. 7, 2019. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
February 07, 2019 - 1:42 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Health and Human Services official responsible for helping to reunite families separated by the Trump administration said Thursday he had warned colleagues that separating children from their parents would cause lasting, serious psychological trauma. Commander Jonathan White...
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President Donald Trump arrives in the House chamber before giving his State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress, Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2019 at the Capitol in Washington. (Doug Mills/The New York Times via AP, Pool)
February 05, 2019 - 11:09 pm
Text of President Donald Trump's State of the Union address, as delivered and provided by CQ: ___ Madam Speaker, Mr. Vice President, members of Congress, the First Lady of the United States, and my fellow Americans. We meet tonight in a moment of unlimited potential as we begin a new Congress, I...
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FILE - In this June 28, 2018, file photo, State Sen. Scott Wiener, D-San Francisco, speaks to members of the Senate in Sacramento, Calif. A new California bill would ban doctors from performing treatment or surgery on the genitalia of intersex children unless its medically necessary or the child is old enough to consent. The California Medical Association said it has serious concerns with the legislation because it removes doctors ability to respond to cases on an individual basis. Wiener's bill released Monday, Feb. 4, 2019, is the latest effort in California aimed at giving minors more control over their bodies and gender identities. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
February 04, 2019 - 8:44 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California doctors would be barred from treating or performing surgery on children born with genitals that don't fit a single gender or are otherwise atypical unless it's medically necessary or the child consents, under a bill unveiled Monday. It's the latest effort by...
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FILE - This Feb. 6, 2015, file photo, shows a measles, mumps and rubella vaccine on a countertop at a pediatrics clinic in Greenbrae, Calif. A measles outbreak near Portland, Ore., has revived a bitter debate over so-called “philosophical” exemptions to childhood vaccinations as public health officials across the Pacific Northwest scramble to limit the fallout from the disease. Washington Gov. Jay Inslee last week declared a state of emergency because of the outbreak on Friday, Jan. 25, 2019. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
February 01, 2019 - 4:00 pm
VANCOUVER, Wash. (AP) — A measles outbreak near Portland, Oregon, has revived a bitter debate over so-called "philosophical" exemptions to childhood vaccinations as public health officials across the Pacific Northwest scramble to limit the fallout. At least 43 people in Washington and Oregon have...
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FILE - This Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2009 file photo shows toothpaste on a toothbrush in Marysville, Pa. A report released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019, says too many young kids are using too much toothpaste, increasing their risk of streaky or splotchy teeth when they get older. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)
January 31, 2019 - 2:56 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Too many young kids are using too much toothpaste, increasing their risk of streaky or splotchy teeth when they get older, according to a government survey released Thursday. About 40 percent of kids ages 3 to 6 used a brush that was full or half-full of toothpaste, even though...
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