Computing and information technology

FILE - In this May 29, 2019 file photo, a man walks past a Huawei retail store in Beijing. On Friday, June 21, 2019, the United States blacklisted five Chinese organizations, calling them national security threats and cutting them off from critical U.S. technology. In May, the U.S. Commerce Department blacklisted telecommunications giant Huawei, heightening tensions with Beijing. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
June 21, 2019 - 7:24 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States is blacklisting five Chinese organizations involved in supercomputing with military-related applications, citing national security as justification for denying its Asian geopolitical rival access to critical U.S. technology. The move Friday by the U.S. Commerce...
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Captain Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger speaks during a House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure hearing on the status of the Boeing 737 MAX on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, June 19, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
June 19, 2019 - 3:58 pm
Airline union leaders and a famed former pilot said Wednesday that Boeing made mistakes while developing the 737 Max, and the biggest was not telling anybody about new flight-control software so pilots could train for it. Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger, who landed a crippled airliner safely on the...
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June 19, 2019 - 7:39 am
LONDON (AP) — An American billionaire has given Oxford University 150 million pounds ($188.6 million) for a new institute that will study the ethical implications of artificial intelligence and computing technologies. The donation from Stephen Schwarzman, CEO of the private equity firm Blackstone,...
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House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., right, joined by Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif, left, the ranking member, opens a hearing on politically motivated fake videos and manipulated media, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 13, 2019. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
June 13, 2019 - 10:01 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Lawmakers and experts are warning that videos altered with artificial intelligence software pose a threat to national security and the 2020 U.S. election. The technology uses facial mapping and artificial intelligence to produce videos — known as "deep fakes" — that appear genuine...
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With a blind police incident report displayed, San Francisco District Attorney George Gascon, left, and Alex Chohlas-Wood, Deputy Director, Stanford Computational Policy Lab, talk about the implementation of an artificial intelligence tool to remove potential for bias in charging decisions, during a news conference Wednesday, June 12, 2019, in San Francisco. In a first-of-its kind experiment, San Francisco prosecutors are turning to artificial intelligence to reduce bias in the criminal courts. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
June 12, 2019 - 6:41 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — In a first-of-its kind experiment, San Francisco prosecutors are turning to artificial intelligence to reduce racial bias in the courts, adopting a system that strips certain identifying details from police reports and leaves only key facts to govern charging decisions...
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FILE - In this April 10, 2018, file photo, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before a joint hearing of the Commerce and Judiciary Committees on Capitol Hill in Washington. Weeks after Facebook refused to remove a doctored video of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi slurring her words, Zuckerberg is getting a taste of his own medicine: fake footage showing him gloating over his one-man domination of the world. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
June 12, 2019 - 3:58 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Three weeks after Facebook refused to remove a doctored video of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi slurring her words, Mark Zuckerberg is getting a taste of his own medicine: fake footage showing him gloating over his one-man domination of the world. It's the latest flap over deviously...
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FILE - In this April 12, 2019 file photo, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai speaks during an event in Washington. Pai announced during a Senate hearing Wednesday, June 12, that he wants phone and cable companies to be more specific about where they offer service and for maps to incorporate public feedback. A vote is planned in August. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
June 12, 2019 - 1:15 pm
U.S. telecom regulators are trying to fix faulty maps that don't reflect which Americans have access to high-speed internet. Lawmakers and public-interest groups have lambasted the Federal Communications Commission for inaccurate maps that overstate coverage and hinder government efforts to...
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FILE - In this March 29, 2019, file photo, vehicles line up to enter the U.S. from Mexico at a border crossing in El Paso, Texas. Customs and Border Protection said Monday, June 10, that photos of travelers and license plates collected at a single U.S. border point have been exposed in a malicious cyberattack in what a leading congressman called a "major privacy breach." (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)
June 10, 2019 - 10:34 pm
Customs and Border Protection said Monday that photos of travelers and license plates collected at a single U.S. border point have been exposed in a malicious cyberattack in what a leading congressman called a "major privacy breach." The federal agency did not name the subcontractor whose computer...
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Vinton Cerf, vice president and Chief Internet Evangelist for Google, answers a question during a news conference at United Nations headquarters, Monday, June 10, 2019. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
June 10, 2019 - 9:55 pm
UNITED NATIONS (AP) — An independent U.N. panel called Monday for much greater cooperation to bring digital technology to roughly half the world's people, and a senior Google executive said mobile phones with internet access are being created to sell for about $20 that can help make this possible...
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In this May 8, 2019, photo, third-grade student Miles Stidham uses an East Webster High School laptop to do homework in Maben, Miss. The Stidhams are unable to get internet at their home in the country, so they take advantage of the internet in the school's library. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)
June 10, 2019 - 2:43 pm
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — With no computer or internet at home, Raegan Byrd's homework assignments present a nightly challenge: How much can she get done using just her smartphone? On the tiny screen, she switches between web pages for research projects, losing track of tabs whenever friends send...
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