Courts

June 24, 2019 - 7:13 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A former top Sacramento Kings executive was sentenced Monday to seven years in prison for siphoning $13.4 million from the team. Jeffrey David, 44, the team's former chief revenue officer, pleaded guilty in December to wire fraud and aggravated identity theft. David diverted...
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June 24, 2019 - 3:18 pm
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — The Democratic speaker of the Maine House of Representatives announced Monday that she is challenging longtime Republican U.S. Sen. Susan Collins, whose political future has generated an enormous amount of attention over the last year. Rep. Sara Gideon, of Freeport, is in her...
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FILE - In this March 14, 2019 file photo Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross testifies during the House Oversight Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. New evidence paints a "disturbing picture" that racial discrimination may be the motive behind the Trump administration's push to ask everyone in the country about citizenship status, a federal judge wrote in a filing, Monday, June 24, 2019. In his court filing, U.S. District Judge George Hazel of Maryland reasoned that new evidence "potentially connects the dots between a discriminatory purpose" and a decision by Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross to add the citizenship question. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)
June 24, 2019 - 12:21 pm
BALTIMORE (AP) — New evidence paints a "disturbing picture" that racial discrimination may be the motive behind the Trump administration's push to ask everyone in the country about citizenship status, a federal judge wrote in a Monday filing. Last week, U.S. District Judge George Hazel of Maryland...
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June 24, 2019 - 9:34 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court has struck down a section of federal law that prevented officials from registering "scandalous" or "immoral" trademarks, handing a victory to a Los Angeles-based fashion brand spelled F-U-C-T. The high court announced its decision Monday. Lawyers for the brand...
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FILE - In this March 21, 2019, file photo, gamblers line up to place bets on the NCAA men's college basketball tournament at the Borgata casino in Atlantic City N.J. This is the first March Madness tournament since legal gambling expanded last year in the U.S. The spread of legalized sports betting is largely following regional boundaries. Lawmakers across the Northeast and upper Midwest have generally approved it or are still considering doing so this year. But in the Deep South and far West, fewer states are rushing in a year after the US Supreme Court cleared the way for legal sports betting nationally. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry, File)
June 23, 2019 - 8:18 am
CHERRY HILL, N.J. (AP) — In the year since the U.S. Supreme Court cleared the way for every state to legalize sports betting , a regional divide has opened as states decide whether to expand their gambling options. By year's end, legalization is possible in a dozen states in the Northeast and...
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FILE - In this March 21, 2019, file photo, gamblers line up to place bets on the NCAA men's college basketball tournament at the Borgata casino in Atlantic City N.J. This is the first March Madness tournament since legal gambling expanded last year in the U.S. The spread of legalized sports betting is largely following regional boundaries. Lawmakers across the Northeast and upper Midwest have generally approved it or are still considering doing so this year. But in the Deep South and far West, fewer states are rushing in a year after the US Supreme Court cleared the way for legal sports betting nationally. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry, File)
June 23, 2019 - 8:12 am
CHERRY HILL, N.J. (AP) — A review of sports betting legislation by The Associated Press shows a regional divide has opened as states decide whether to expand their gambling options. By year's end, legalization is possible in a dozen states in the Northeast and Midwest. But most states in the Deep...
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FILE - In this Oct. 4, 2018, file photo, The U.S. Supreme Court is seen at sunset in Washington. The Supreme Court enters its final week with two issues to decide that could shape the distribution of political power for the next decade: whether to rein in political boundary-drawing for partisan gain and allow a citizenship question on the 2020 census. The justice also might say whether their election-year calendar will make room for President Donald Trump’s effort to end the Obama-era program that shields young immigrants from deportation. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)
June 23, 2019 - 7:08 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court enters its final week of decisions with two politically charged issues unresolved, whether to rein in political line-drawing for partisan gain and allow a citizenship question on the 2020 census. Both decisions could affect the distribution of political power for...
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FILE - In this Oct. 4, 2018, file photo, The U.S. Supreme Court is seen at sunset in Washington. The Supreme Court enters its final week with two issues to decide that could shape the distribution of political power for the next decade: whether to rein in political boundary-drawing for partisan gain and allow a citizenship question on the 2020 census. The justice also might say whether their election-year calendar will make room for President Donald Trump’s effort to end the Obama-era program that shields young immigrants from deportation. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)
June 23, 2019 - 7:06 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court enters its final week of decisions with two politically charged issues unresolved, whether to rein in political line-drawing for partisan gain and allow a citizenship question on the 2020 census. Both decisions could affect the distribution of political power for...
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FILE - In this June 14, 2010 file photograph, Clemmie Flemming points out to prosecutor Doug Evans, center, where she spotted Curtis Giovanni Flowers on the morning of four slayings at Tardy Furniture in Greenwood, Miss. Evans, a Mississippi prosecutor who has tried the same man six times in a death penalty case now will decide whether to seek a seventh trial after the U.S. Supreme Court found racial bias in jury selection. (Taylor Kuykendall/The Commonwealth via AP, File)
June 22, 2019 - 8:44 am
JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — A Mississippi prosecutor has tried and failed six times to send Curtis Flowers to the death chamber, with the latest trial conviction and death sentence overturned on Friday because of racial bias in jury selection. Now, that same prosecutor must decide whether to try Flowers...
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FILE - In this March 20, 2019 file photo, Attorney Sheri Johnson leaves the Supreme Court after challenging a Mississippi prosecutor's decision to keep African-Americans off the jury in the trial of Curtis Flowers, in Washington. The Supreme Court is throwing out the murder conviction and death sentence for Flowers because of a prosecutor's efforts to keep African Americans off the jury. The defendant already has been tried six times and now could face a seventh trial. The court's 7-2 decision Friday says the removal of black prospective jurors violated the rights of inmate Curtis Flowers. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
June 22, 2019 - 1:27 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Friday threw out the murder conviction and death sentence for a black man in Mississippi because of a prosecutor's efforts to keep African Americans off the jury. The defendant already has been tried six times and now could face a seventh trial. The removal of...
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