Deserts

January 29, 2020 - 3:00 am
DAKAR, Senegal (AP) — As extremist violence grows across Africa, the United States is considering reducing its military presence on the continent, a move that worries its international partners who are working to strengthen the fight in the tumultuous Sahel region. The timing is especially critical...
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FILE - In this June 11, 2019, file photo, Scott Warren, center, speaks outside federal court, in Tucson, Ariz., after a mistrial was declared in the federal case against him. Warren is scheduled to testify Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2019, in the second criminal case against his actions as a member of a humanitarian aid group. Prosecutors say Warren was arrested in early 2018 after harboring two men who sneaked across the U.S.-Mexico border. (AP Photo/Astrid Galvan, File)
November 19, 2019 - 6:46 pm
TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) — A member of a humanitarian aid group whose criminal case has garnered international attention testified Tuesday that neutrality guides his work near the U.S.-Mexico border, denying that he has ever helped migrants hide or told them how to avoid authorities. That’s what U.S...
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FILE - This July 16, 2013, file photo shows a sign at Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. Facebook is trying to coax “news deserts” into bloom with the expansion of a tool that provides people with local news and information, but says it still has a lot to learn. The social media giant said Thursday, Sept. 12, 2019, it is expanding its “Today In” service to 6,000 cities and towns across the U.S., up from 400 previously. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)
September 12, 2019 - 5:04 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Facebook is trying to coax "news deserts" into bloom with the second major expansion of a tool that exposes people to more local news and information. But the social network confesses that it still has a lot to learn. The social media giant said Thursday it is expanding its "...
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FILE - In this Feb. 12, 2011 file photo a bison from Yellowstone National Park walks through the snow shortly before being shot and killed during a hunt by members of an American Indian tribe, near Gardiner, Mont. U.S. officials have rejected a petition to protect the park's roughly 4,500 bison, which are routinely hunted and sent to slaughter to guard against the spread of disease to cattle. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
September 05, 2019 - 7:04 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — U.S. wildlife officials rejected petitions Thursday to protect Yellowstone National Park's storied bison herds but pledged to consider more help for two other species — a tiny, endangered squirrel in Arizona and bees that pollinate rare desert flowers in Nevada. Wildlife...
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Workers break ground on new border wall construction about 20 miles west of Santa Teresa, New Mexico, Aug. 23, 2019. The wall visible on the left was built in 2018 with money allocated by Congress, while the new construction is funded by money reallocated from Department of Defense funding. (AP Photo/Cedar Attanasio)
August 23, 2019 - 5:53 pm
SANTA TERESA, N.M. (AP) — Work crews in Arizona and New Mexico forged ahead Friday with construction of taller border fencing funded through a national emergency declaration by President Donald Trump. The work on his hallmark campaign promise involves mostly replacement fencing along a 46-mile...
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FILE - This Monday, July 30, 2018 file photo shows rows of soybean plants in a field near Bennington, Neb. A report by the United Nations released on Thursday, Aug. 8, 2019 says that human-caused climate change is dramatically degrading the planet’s land, while the way people use the Earth is making global warming worse. The vicious cycle is already making food more expensive, scarcer and even less nutritious, as well as cutting the number of species on Earth, according to a special report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
August 08, 2019 - 3:07 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — On the ground, climate change is hitting us where it counts: the stomach — not to mention the forests, plants and animals. A new United Nations scientific report examines how global warming and land interact in a vicious cycle. Human-caused climate change is dramatically degrading...
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FILE - In this Aug. 31, 2013 file photo, the "Man" burns on the Black Rock Desert at Burning Man near Gerlach, Nev. With Burning Man less than 100 days away, organizers are awaiting permits and decisions by federal land managers that could reshape the cost and conduct of the counter-culture festival in northern Nevada.(Andy Barron/The Reno Gazette-Journal via AP, File)
May 31, 2019 - 1:39 pm
RENO, Nev. (AP) — With Burning Man three months away, organizers are still waiting for permits and decisions by U.S. land managers that could reshape the counterculture festival in northern Nevada. The U.S. Bureau of Land Management is reviewing more than 2,000 public comments about a document...
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FILE - In this June 11, 2014 file photo, James Lyons and Florence Reaves, from Kirkwood, Mo., hike to a stone lookout over the Little Missouri River inside the Theodore Roosevelt National Park, located in the Badlands of North Dakota. An heir to the Wal-Mart fortune, a wealthy governor and energy companies operating in the North Dakota oil patch could fund a big chunk of the private money needed by developers of a presidential library for Theodore Roosevelt in the western Badlands. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast, File)
May 05, 2019 - 10:05 am
BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — A Walmart heir, a wealthy governor and energy companies profiting from North Dakota oil could fund a big chunk of the private money needed by developers of a presidential library for Theodore Roosevelt in the western Badlands where he hunted and ranched before becoming the...
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FILE - In this April 8, 1998, file photo, a worker drives a cart through a tunnel inside the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant No. 2, 150 feet below the surface near Carlsbad, N.M. Twenty years and more than 12,330 shipments later, tons of Cold War-era radioactive waste from decades of bomb-making and research have been stashed in the salt caverns that make up the underground facility and not without issues. (AP Photo/Eric Draper, File)
March 23, 2019 - 5:51 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — In a remote stretch of New Mexico desert, the U.S. government put in motion an experiment aimed at proving to the world that radioactive waste could be safely disposed of deep underground, rendering it less of a threat to the environment. Twenty years and more than 12,380...
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In this Monday, March 11, 2019 photo, Peggy and her husband George Sellars sit by the "lake" that was the driveway to their home, along Mississippi 16, east of Rolling Fork, Miss. The couple said the backwater flooding is the worse they have encountered and correctly concluded that water would overtop the retention levee that protected their house and three others. This week the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the Mississippi Emergency Management Agency (MEMA), along with select local emergency management offices will be conducting joint damage assessments in response to the severe storms and flooding are impacting the state. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)
March 12, 2019 - 12:40 pm
ROLLING FORK, Miss. (AP) — For decades, Peggy Sellars and her husband George have warily watched periodic floodwaters inundate the land around their home in the Mississippi Delta, but the dwelling always remained dry — until this year. After weeks of fearful waiting, rising water finally got their...
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