Environment and nature

President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump tour a neighborhood affected by Hurricane Michael, Monday, Oct. 15, 2018, in Lynn Haven, Fla. Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen is front right. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
October 15, 2018 - 2:12 pm
PANAMA CITY, Fla. (AP) — President Donald Trump got a bird's-eye view Monday of Florida communities left in ruins by Hurricane Michael, including houses without roofs, a toppled water tower and 18-wheel trucks scattered in a parking lot during a nearly hour-long helicopter tour of portions of the...
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FILE - In this April 4, 2013, file photo, a mining dumper truck hauls coal at Cloud Peak Energy's Spring Creek strip mine near Decker, Mont. The Trump administration is considering using West Coast military bases or other federal properties as transit points for shipments of U.S. coal and natural gas to Asia. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown, File)
October 15, 2018 - 1:09 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — The Trump administration is considering using West Coast military bases or other federal properties as transit points for shipments of U.S. coal and natural gas to Asia, as officials seek to bolster the domestic energy industry and circumvent environmental opposition to...
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This photo shows devastation from Hurricane Michael in this aerial photo over Mexico Beach, Fla., Friday, Oct. 12, 2018. Blocks and blocks of homes were demolished, reduced to piles of splintered lumber or mere concrete slabs, by the most powerful hurricane to hit the continental U.S. in nearly 50 years. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
October 15, 2018 - 10:15 am
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Unlike in South Florida, homes in the state's Panhandle did not have tighter building codes until just 11 years ago; it was once argued that acres of forests would provide the region with a natural barrier against the savage winds of a hurricane. Many of those structures...
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FILE - This Wednesday, April 19, 2017 file photo shows the beer cooler behind the counter in a convenience store in Sheridan, Ind. In future sweltering years with a double whammy of heat and drought, losses of barley yield can be as much as 17 percent, computer simulations show. And that means “beer prices would, on average, double,” even adjusting for inflation, said a study published in the journal Nature Plants on Wednesday, Oct. 17, 2018. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)
October 15, 2018 - 10:03 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Add beer to chocolate , coffee and wine as some of life's little pleasures that global warming will make scarcer and costlier, scientists say. Increasing bouts of extreme heat waves and drought will hurt production of barley, a key beer ingredient, in the future. Losses of barley...
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October 15, 2018 - 9:28 am
FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — Prosecutors say law enforcement officials have conducted searches at German automaker Opel as part of an investigation into suspected manipulation of diesel emissions. The dpa news agency reported that investors went to company facilities Monday in Russelsheim and...
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Candace Phillips sifts through what was her third-floor bedroom while returning to her damaged home in Mexico Beach, Fla., Sunday, Oct. 14, 2018, in the aftermath of Hurricane Michael. "We spent 25 years of our marriage working to get here and we're going to stay," said Phillips of her and husband's plans to rebuild. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
October 15, 2018 - 4:33 am
MEXICO BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Upon touring the damage in several towns along Florida's Panhandle, Federal Emergency Management Agency chief Brock Long called the destruction left by Hurricane Michael some of the worst he's ever seen. On Monday, President Donald Trump plans to visit Florida and Georgia...
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Officials unload the bodies after a helicopter carrying bodies of those killed in Gurja Himal mountain arrives at the Teaching hospital in Kathmandu, Nepal, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2018. Rescuers retrieved the bodies of five South Korean climbers and their four Nepalese guides from Gurja Himal mountain, where they were killed when their base camp was swept by a strong storm. (AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha)
October 15, 2018 - 1:02 am
KATHMANDU, Nepal (AP) — The nine climbers who died during the worst disaster on a Nepal mountain in recent years included the first South Korean to summit all 14 Himalayan peaks over 8,000 meters without using supplemental oxygen. An official from the South Korea's Corean Alpine Club said the...
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President Donald Trump crosses the South Lawn on his return to the White House, Saturday Oct. 13, 2018, in Washington, after a trip to Kentucky. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
October 15, 2018 - 12:26 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is backing off his claim that climate change is a hoax but says he doesn't know if it's manmade and suggests that the climate will "change back again." In an interview with CBS' "60 Minutes" that aired Sunday night, Trump said he doesn't want to put the U.S...
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Marla Wood pulls a framed art piece out of the rubble of her damaged home from Hurricane Michael in Mexico Beach, Fla., Sunday, Oct. 14, 2018. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
October 14, 2018 - 8:38 pm
MEXICO BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Crews with backhoes and other heavy equipment scooped up splintered boards, broken glass, chunks of asphalt and other debris in hurricane-flattened Mexico Beach on Sunday as the mayor held out hope for the 250 or so residents who may have tried to ride out the storm. The...
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This July 6, 2017 photo shows a makeshift memorial to Hispanic Civil War Union soldiers who fought in the Battle of Glorieta Pass in Northern New Mexico outside Santa Fe. It's a typical representation for many sites linked to U.S. Latino history: It's shabby, largely unknown and always at risk of disappearing if it weren't for a handful of history aficionados. The lack of historical markers and preserved historical sites connected to Latino civil rights worries scholars who feel the scarcity is affecting how Americans see Hispanics in U.S. history. (AP Photo/Russell Contreras)
October 14, 2018 - 7:10 pm
GLORIETA PASS, N.M. (AP) — A makeshift memorial to Hispanic Civil War Union soldiers in an isolated part northern New Mexico is a typical representation of sites linked to U.S. Latino history: It's shabby, largely unknown and at risk of disappearing. Across the U.S, many sites historically...
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