environment

FILE - This Oct. 17, 2018 photo shows a Chevrolet Volt hybrid car charging at a ChargePoint charging station at a parking garage in Los Angeles. The country, and the world, will need thousands more for drivers to accept vehicles that are powered by batteries alone. But automakers and charging companies are struggling to raise the numbers now because they’re investing before demand arrives. With more than 40 fully electric vehicles on the market in the U.S. or coming within the next three years, however, auto and charging company executives say the demand is on the way.(AP Photo/Richard Vogel, File)
July 31, 2020 - 3:26 pm
DETROIT (AP) — When the electric car revolution arrives, will there be enough places to plug in? There are now 26,000 electric vehicle charging stations open to the public in the U.S., with more than 84,000 plugs. But the country, and the world, will need thousands more if drivers are going to...
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In this May 15, 2019, file photo, the Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River is seen from the air near Colfax, Washington. The federal government said Friday, July 31, 2020, four giant dams on the Snake River in Washington state will not be removed to help endangered salmon migrate to the ocean. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
July 31, 2020 - 2:17 pm
SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — The U.S. government announced Friday that four huge dams on the Snake River in Washington state will not be removed to help endangered salmon migrate to the ocean. The decision thwarts the desires of environmental groups that fought for two decades to breach the structures...
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Trash rests piled up on a street Tuesday, July 28, 2020, in the Kensington neighborhood of Philadelphia. The COVID-19 pandemic has frustrated efforts to keep Philadelphia's streets clear of garbage this summer. Residents complain about the stink and the flies. (Kara Kneidl via AP)
July 30, 2020 - 2:20 pm
What would Ben Franklin think? The Founding Father who launched one of America’s first street-sweeping programs in Philadelphia in the late 1750s would see and smell piles of fly-infested, rotting household waste, bottles and cans as the city that he called home struggles to overcome a surge in...
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FILE - In this Aug. 11, 2016, file photo, a great white shark tries to bite a fish head being trolled though the water as researchers chum the ocean looking for sharks off the coast of Gansbaai, South Africa. Seals are thriving off the Northeast United States coast thanks to decades of protections. That victory for wildlife has brought a consequence for humans: more encounters with sharks. The Monday, July 27, 2020, death of swimmer Julie Dimperio Holowach, who was killed by a great white off Harpswell, Maine, might have happened because the shark mistook her for a seal, authorities said. (AP Photo/Schalk van Zuydam, File)
July 30, 2020 - 7:04 am
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Seals are thriving off the Northeast coast thanks to decades of protections, and that victory for wildlife has brought a consequence for humans — more encounters with sharks. Seals are a favorite prey of large sharks such as the great white. The death this week of swimmer...
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FILE - In this July 29, 2020, file photo President Donald Trump arrives to deliver remarks about American energy production during a visit to the Double Eagle Energy Oil Rig in Midland, Texas. Trump, like many fellow Republicans, holds out tax reductions and regulatory cuts as economic cure-alls and frames himself as a conservative champion in seemingly endless culture wars. But the president, still trying to fashion himself as an outsider, offers little detail about how he’d pull the levers of government in a second term. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
July 30, 2020 - 4:41 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump and his Democratic challenger, Joe Biden, both promise sweeping progress over the next four years –- via starkly different paths. Trump, like many fellow Republicans, holds out tax reductions and regulatory cuts as economic cure-alls and frames himself as a...
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President Donald Trump adjusts his jacket as he stands with Double Eagle Energy co-CEOs Cody Campbell, left, and John Sellers, right before viewing the Double Eagle Energy Oil Rig, Wednesday, July 29, 2020, in Midland, Texas. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
July 29, 2020 - 7:21 pm
MIDLAND, Texas (AP) — President Donald Trump took sweeping digs at “crazy left radical Democrats” on a trip Wednesday to the fracking fields of West Texas, launching unsubstantiated claims that a Democratic administration would destroy everything from the country's suburbs to the U.S. energy...
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FILE - This April 26, 2020, file photo shows empty lanes of the 110 Arroyo Seco Parkway that leads to downtown Los Angeles during the coronavirus outbreak in Los Angeles, Calif. A record drop in U.S. energy consumption this spring was driven by less demand for coal that's burned for electricity and oil that's refined into gasoline and jet fuel. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill, File)
July 29, 2020 - 4:20 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — U.S. energy consumption plummeted to its lowest level in more than 30 years this spring as the nation’s economy largely shut down because of the coronavirus, federal officials reported Wednesday. The drop was driven by less demand for coal that is burned for electricity and...
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FILE- In this July 24, 2020, file photo President Donald Trump speaks during an event to sign executive orders on lowering drug prices, in the South Court Auditorium in the White House complex in Washington. Trump is working overtime to solidify his image as a champion regulation-cutter in the leadup to the November election. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
July 25, 2020 - 10:01 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is positioning himself as a champion regulation-cutter in the leadup to the Nov. 3 election, but in between his showy red-tape-cutting events, his deregulatory agenda is taking a beating in the courts. One day, he’s hailing a massive rollback to one of the...
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FILE - In this April 22, 1952 file photo a gigantic pillar of smoke with the familiar mushroom top climbs above Yucca Flat, Nev. during nuclear test detonation. A defense spending bill pending in Congress includes an apology to New Mexico, Nevada, Utah and other states affected by nuclear testing over the decades, but communities downwind from the first atomic test in 1945 are still holding out for compensation amid rumblings about the potential for the U.S. to resume nuclear testing. (AP Photo,File)
July 24, 2020 - 6:10 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Deep within a multibillion-dollar defense spending measure pending in Congress is an apology to New Mexico, Nevada, Utah and other states affected by radiation from nuclear testing over the decades. But communities downwind from the first atomic test in the New Mexico...
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FILE - In this July 13, 2007, file photo, workers with the Pebble Mine project test drill in the Bristol Bay region of Alaska, near the village of Iliamma. The Pebble Limited Partnership, which wants to build a copper and gold mine near the headwaters of a major U.S. salmon fishery in southwest Alaska, says it plans to offer residents in the region a dividend. (AP Photo/Al Grillo, File)
July 24, 2020 - 5:00 pm
JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — A proposed copper and gold mine that critics fear would imperil a major U.S. salmon fishery got a boost Friday with the release of an environmental review that the developer of the Pebble Mine sees as laying the groundwork for key federal approvals as early as this summer. The...
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