Executions

FILE--In this Thursday, Nov. 17, 2016, file photo, Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge speaks to reporters at Trump Tower, in New York. A federal lawsuit filed by death row inmates in Arkansas has renewed a court fight over whether the sedative Arkansas uses for lethal injections causes torturous executions, two years after the state raced to put eight convicted killers to death in 11 days before its batch expired. Rutledge says the inmates in the case have a very high burden to meet and cites a U.S. Supreme Court ruling last month against a Missouri death row inmate. Arkansas recently expanded the secrecy surrounding its lethal injection drug sources, and the case heading to trial Tuesday, April 23, 2019 could impact its efforts to restart executions that had been on hold due to supply. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)
April 20, 2019 - 11:28 am
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — A federal lawsuit filed by death row inmates has renewed a court fight over whether the sedative Arkansas uses for lethal injections causes torturous executions, two years after the state raced to put eight convicted killers to death in 11 days before a previous batch of...
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FILE - This May 27, 2008, file photo, shows the gurney in the death chamber in Huntsville, Texas. A supplier of Texas' execution drugs can remain secret under a court ruling that cited a risk of "physical harm" to the compounding pharmacy if the information became public. The Texas Supreme Court's decision Friday, April 12, 2019, ends a long-running legal battle that began in 2014 over the drugs used in the nation's busiest execution chamber. (AP Photo/Pat Sullivan, File)
April 12, 2019 - 2:07 pm
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — A supplier of Texas' execution drugs can remain secret under a court ruling Friday that upheld risks of "physical harm" to the pharmacy, ending what state officials called a threat to the entire U.S. death penalty system. The decision by the Texas Supreme Court, where...
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FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Alabama Department of Corrections shows Christopher Lee Price. A federal judge on Thursday evening, April 11, 2019, has halted the planned execution of Price, who was convicted of the sword-and-dagger stabbing death of a pastor. U.S. District Judge Kristi K. DuBose issued the stay two hours before the scheduled lethal injection of 46-year-old Price. (Alabama Department of Corrections via AP, File)
April 12, 2019 - 3:38 am
ATMORE, Ala. (AP) — An Alabama inmate convicted in the 1991 sword-and-dagger slaying of a pastor was spared from a scheduled lethal injection after the state was unable to lift a last-minute stay in time to carry out his execution Thursday evening. A federal judge on Thursday stayed the execution...
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FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Texas Department of Criminal Justice shows Patrick Murphy. Texas prisons will no longer allow clergy in the death chamber after the U.S. Supreme Court blocked the scheduled execution of Murphy who argued his religious freedom would be violated if his Buddhist spiritual adviser couldn't accompany him. The Texas Department of Criminal Justice says Wednesday, April 3, 2019, effective immediately it will only permit security staff into the death chamber because of the high court's ruling staying the execution of Murphy, a member of the "Texas 7" gang of escaped prisoners. (Texas Department of Criminal Justice via AP, File)
April 04, 2019 - 12:42 am
DALLAS (AP) — Texas prisons will no longer allow clergy in the death chamber after the U.S. Supreme Court blocked the scheduled execution of a man who argued his religious freedom would be violated if his Buddhist spiritual adviser couldn't accompany him. Effective immediately, the Texas Department...
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April 01, 2019 - 9:44 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court said Monday that Missouri can execute an inmate who argued his rare medical condition will result in severe pain if he is given death-causing drugs. The justices split along ideological lines in ruling 5-4 against inmate Russell Bucklew (BUCK-loo), who is on...
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FILE - In this Oct. 4, 2018 file photo, the U.S. Supreme Court is seen at sunset in Washington. Texas death row inmate Patrick Murphy and Alabama death row inmate Dominique Ray both came to the Supreme Court recently with the same request. Halt my execution, each said, because the state won’t let my spiritual adviser accompany me into the execution chamber, even as other inmates of different faiths get that ability. But while the Supreme Court declined to stop Ray’s execution in February, they gave Murphy a temporary reprieve Thursday night. The difference in the two cases looks like it comes down to when each man asked for his spiritual adviser to be present. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
March 30, 2019 - 5:31 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Death row inmates Patrick Murphy and Domineque Ray each turned to courts recently with a similar plea: Halt my execution if the state won't let a spiritual adviser of my faith accompany me into the execution chamber. Both cases wound up at the Supreme Court. And while the justices...
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This undated photo provided by the Texas Department of Criminal Justice shows Patrick Murphy. Lawyers for the member of the notorious "Texas 7" gang of escaped prisoners who is scheduled to be executed Thursday, March 28, 2019, say he should be spared because he never fatally shot a suburban Dallas police officer during a Christmas Eve robbery nearly 18 years earlier. Murphy is slated to die by lethal injection after 6 p.m. at the state penitentiary in Huntsville. (Texas Department of Criminal Justice via AP)
March 28, 2019 - 10:28 pm
HUNTSVILLE, Texas (AP) — A member of the "Texas 7" gang of escaped prisoners won a reprieve Thursday night from execution for the fatal shooting of a suburban Dallas police officer after claiming his religious freedom would be violated if his Buddhist spiritual adviser wasn't allowed to be in the...
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March 18, 2019 - 8:47 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is rejecting a new appeal from a Georgia death row inmate, despite evidence that a juror in his capital case used racial slurs. The high court had previously blocked the execution of Georgia inmate Keith Leroy Tharpe. But the justices on Monday refused to take up...
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Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., speaks during an event in St. George, S.C., on Saturday, March 9, 2019. Harris is spending two days in South Carolina, home of the first southern presidential primary in 2020, spending time with voters in rural and coastal areas. (AP Photo/Meg Kinnard)
March 14, 2019 - 6:37 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic presidential candidate Kamala Harris says there should be a federal moratorium on executions. The senator from California discussed the matter on National Public Radio on Thursday, a day after Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom of California granted reprieves to 737 death row...
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Flanked by lawmakers, Gov. Gavin Newsom discusses his decision to place a moratorium on the death penalty during a news conference at the Capitol, March 13, 2019, in Sacramento, Calif. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
March 13, 2019 - 7:20 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Gov. Gavin Newsom not only put a moratorium on executions in California on Wednesday, he said he also may commute death sentences and is pushing to repeal capital punishment. Newsom signed an executive order granting reprieves to all 737 condemned inmates on the nation's...
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