Food packaging manufacturing

October 29, 2019 - 7:51 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Johnson & Johnson said Tuesday that new testing of a batch of baby powder that was recently recalled did not show any traces of asbestos. Earlier this month the company recalled 33,000 bottles of its talc powder after Food and Drug Administration testing revealed trace amounts...
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FILE - In this Nov. 15, 2016, file photo, crushed plastic bottles sit in a bale following sorting at the Mid-America Recycling plant, in Lincoln, Neb. Coca-Cola Co., PepsiCo and Keurig Dr. Pepper are investing $100 million to improve U.S. bottle recycling and processing. (Francis Gardler/The Journal-Star via AP, File)
October 29, 2019 - 8:07 am
Every year, an estimated 100 billion plastic bottles are produced in the U.S., the bulk of which come from three of America's biggest beverage companies: Coca-Cola, Pepsi and Keurig Dr. Pepper. The problem? Only one-third of those bottles get recycled; the rest end up in the trash. That bleak trend...
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October 25, 2019 - 2:32 pm
Walmart, CVS and Rite Aid have pulled some or all 22-ounce bottles of Johnson's baby powder from shelves to avoid confusing consumers, after a minuscule amount of asbestos was found in one bottle. Johnson & Johnson recalled all 33,000 bottles from the same lot as that bottle last Friday, a day...
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FILE - This Nov. 10, 2005, file photo shows a bottle of Poland Spring water in Fryeburg, Maine. The Maine-based company announced a plan on Monday, June 3, 3019, to use 100% recycled plastic for all its noncarbonated water containers by 2022. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, file)
June 03, 2019 - 3:00 pm
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Poland Spring announced Monday a plan to use 100% recycled plastic for all its noncarbonated water containers, a move that comes amid growing concern about plastic pollution. The Maine-based company said the effort kicks off this month with 1-liter bottles. By 2022, the...
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A conventional beef burger, left, is seen Friday, Jan. 11, 2019, next to "The Impossible Burger", right, a plant-based burger containing wheat protein, coconut oil and potato protein among it's ingredients. The ingredients of the Impossible Burger are clearly printed on the menu at Stella's Bar & Grill in Bellevue, Neb., where the meat and non-meat burgers are served. More than four months after Missouri became the first U.S. state to regulate the term "meat" on product labels, Nebraska's powerful farm groups are pushing for similar protection from veggie burgers, tofu dogs and other items that look and taste like meat. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
January 13, 2019 - 9:44 am
LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) — More than four months after Missouri became the first U.S. state to regulate the term "meat" on product labels, Nebraska's powerful farm groups are pushing for similar protection from veggie burgers, tofu dogs and other items that look and taste like real meat. Nebraska...
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August 27, 2018 - 11:53 am
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Vegetarian food-maker Tofurky filed a lawsuit in Missouri on Monday seeking to defend its right to describe its products with meat terminology such as "sausage" and "hot dogs," as long as the packaging makes clear what the ingredients are. The Hood River, Oregon-based...
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