Food science

This 2013 photo provided by the Boyce Thompson Institute shows corn leaf aphids used in a study to modify crop plants through engineered viruses. In an opinion paper published Thursday, Oct. 4, 2018, in the journal Science, the authors say the U.S. needs to provide greater justification for the peace-time purpose of its Insect Allies project to avoid being perceived as hostile to other countries. Other experts expressed ethical and security concerns with the research, which seeks to transmit protective traits to crops already growing in the field. (Meena Haribal/Boyce Thompson Institute via AP)
October 04, 2018 - 3:14 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A research arm of the U.S. military is exploring the possibility of deploying insects to make plants more resilient by altering their genes. Some experts say the work may be seen as a potential biological weapon. In an opinion paper published Thursday in the journal Science, the...
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This undated image made available by Frank Peairs in 2007 shows a European corn borer. A warmer world likely means more and hungrier insects chomping on crops and less food on dinner plates, a new study suggests. (Frank Peairs/Colorado State University/Bugwood.org via AP)
August 30, 2018 - 1:29 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A new study predicts that a warmer world likely means more and hungrier insects chomping on crops and less food on dinner plates. Insects now consume about 10 percent of the globe's food, but the researchers say that will increase to 15 to 20 percent by the end of the century if...
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This undated photo provided by the J.R. Simplot Company shows a sign outside the J.R. Simplot Company in Boise. Idaho-based J.R. Simplot Company has acquired gene editing licensing rights that could one day be used to help farmers produce more crops and grocery store offerings such as strawberries, potatoes and avocados stay fresher longer. The company on Monday, Aug. 6, 2018, announced the agreement with DowDuPont Inc. and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, developers of the nascent gene editing technology. (J.R. Simplot Company via AP)
August 06, 2018 - 12:44 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — A multinational agricultural company based in Idaho has acquired gene editing licensing rights that could one day be used to help farmers produce more crops and make grocery store offerings such as strawberries, potatoes and avocados stay fresher longer. J.R. Simplot Company on...
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