Genetically modified food

Peter Bowyer, the facility manager at AquaBounty Technologies, holds one of the last batch of conventional Atlantic salmon raised at the commercial fish farm in Albany, Ind., Wednesday, June 19, 2019. AquaBounty will be producing the first genetically modified animals approved for human food in the U.S. and one way companies are pushing to transform plants and animals, as consumer advocacy groups call for greater caution. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)
June 21, 2019 - 12:11 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Inside an Indiana aquafarming complex, thousands of salmon eggs genetically modified to grow faster than normal are hatching into tiny fish. After growing to roughly 10 pounds (4.5 kilograms) in indoor tanks, they could be served in restaurants by late next year. The salmon produced...
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This 2009 photo provided by AquaBountyTechnologies shows a juvenile salmon raised at the company's hatchery in Fortune, Prince Edward Island, Canada. On Friday, March 8, 2019, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said it had lifted an alert had that had prevented AquaBounty from importing its salmon eggs to its Indiana facility, where they would be grown before being sold as food. (AquaBountyTechnologies via AP)
March 08, 2019 - 9:06 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. regulators on Friday gave the green light to salmon genetically modified to grow about twice as fast as normal, but the company behind it may face legal challenges before the fish can be sold domestically. The Food and Drug Administration said it lifted an alert that had...
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The 2018 Nobel Chemistry laureate, Frances H. Arnold poses during the traditional Nobel Chair Signing ceremony at the Nobel Museum in Stockholm, Sweden, on Thursday Dec. 6, 2018. (Claudio Brescian/TT via AP)
December 07, 2018 - 4:39 am
STOCKHOLM (AP) — Winners of this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry say that excessive concerns about genetically modified foods and other substances can inhibit mankind from benefiting from developments in the field. Frances Arnold from the United States and Gregory Winter of Britain made the...
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This undated photo provided by the J.R. Simplot Company shows a sign outside the J.R. Simplot Company in Boise. Idaho-based J.R. Simplot Company has acquired gene editing licensing rights that could one day be used to help farmers produce more crops and grocery store offerings such as strawberries, potatoes and avocados stay fresher longer. The company on Monday, Aug. 6, 2018, announced the agreement with DowDuPont Inc. and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, developers of the nascent gene editing technology. (J.R. Simplot Company via AP)
August 06, 2018 - 12:44 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — A multinational agricultural company based in Idaho has acquired gene editing licensing rights that could one day be used to help farmers produce more crops and make grocery store offerings such as strawberries, potatoes and avocados stay fresher longer. J.R. Simplot Company on...
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