Genetics

This undated photo provided by Johns Hopkins University shows Gregg L. Semenza at the university in Baltimore. Semenza, a Johns Hopkins University researcher, was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine on Monday, Oct. 7, 2019. He will share the prize with Drs. William G. Kaelin Jr. and Peter J. Ratcliffe for their discoveries of how cells sense and adapt to oxygen availability, the Nobel Committee announced Monday. (Johns Hopkins University via AP)
October 07, 2019 - 7:48 am
STOCKHOLM (AP) — The Latest on the Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology (all times local): 2:40 p.m. Dr. Gregg Semenza, a top researcher at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, says he was awakened by a call from Stockholm shortly before 4 a.m. with the good news that he is one of three...
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ADDS THAT THE GROUP HAS PULLED THE VIDEO This image made from the National Academy of Sciences website on Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2019 shows part of a video of people discussing gene editing and designer babies. The group pulled the video and issued an apology after some criticism. The video gives the inaccurate impression that gene editing can give positive traits without any potential downsides - “the definition of hubris,” said Harvard Medical School dean Dr. George Q. Daley, who also has been involved in academy work. “We are not there yet.” (National Academy of Sciences via AP)
October 02, 2019 - 8:21 pm
A government-funded group that’s leading efforts to set standards for gene editing has pulled a video it posted in the wake of concern about how it portrayed the ethically dicey science and its possible use to make designer babies. The National Academy of Sciences posted the video earlier this week...
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This 2011 electron microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control shows HIV virions. On Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2019, scientists are reporting the first use of the gene-editing tool CRISPR to try to cure a patient's HIV infection by providing blood cells that have been altered to resist the AIDS virus. (Maureen Metcalfe, Tom Hodge/CDC via AP)
September 11, 2019 - 4:03 pm
Scientists are reporting the first use of the gene-editing tool CRISPR to try to cure a patient's HIV infection by providing blood cells that were altered to resist the AIDS virus. The gene-editing tool has long been used in research labs, and a Chinese scientist was scorned last year when he...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, July 15, 2015 file photo, a lesbian couple holds hands in Salt Lake City. Released on Thursday, Aug. 29, 2019, the largest study of its kind found new evidence that genes contribute to same-sex sexual behavior, echoing research that says there is no single “gay gene.” (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
August 29, 2019 - 1:41 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — The largest study of its kind found new evidence that genes contribute to same-sex sexual behavior, but it echoes research that says there are no specific genes that make people gay. The genome-wide research on DNA from nearly half a million U.S. and U.K. adults identified five...
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Cheryl Hayashi uses a microscope to work on a spider in her lab at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Hayashi has collected spider silk glands of about 50 species, just a small dent in the more than 48,000 spider species known worldwide. (AP Photo/Jeremy Rehm)
August 14, 2019 - 11:11 am
NEW YORK (AP) — With two pairs of fine-tipped tweezers and the hands of a surgeon, Cheryl Hayashi began dissecting the body of a silver garden spider under her microscope. In just a few minutes she found what she was seeking: hundreds of silk glands, the organs spiders use to make their webs. Some...
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FILE - This April 12, 2018 file photo shows the eye of a woman in New York. Patients are about to be enrolled in the first study to test gene editing inside the body to try to cure an inherited form of blindness. People with the disease have healthy eyes but lack a gene that converts light into signals to the brain that enable sight. (AP Photo/Patrick Sison, File)
July 25, 2019 - 11:08 am
Patients are about to be enrolled in the first study to test a gene-editing technique known as CRISPR inside the body to try to cure an inherited form of blindness. People with the disease have normal eyes but lack a gene that converts light into signals to the brain that enable sight. The...
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FILE - In this Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018 file photo, an elderly couple walks past the Berlaymont building, the European Commission headquarters, in Brussels. Research released on Sunday, July 14, 2019 suggests that a healthy lifestyle can cut the risk of developing Alzheimer's even if you've inherited genes that raise your risk for the mind-destroying disease. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco, File)
July 14, 2019 - 12:28 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — A healthy lifestyle can cut your risk of developing Alzheimer's or other forms of dementia even if you have genes that raise your risk for these mind-destroying diseases, a large study has found. People with high genetic risk and poor health habits were about three times more...
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Peter Bowyer, the facility manager at AquaBounty Technologies, holds one of the last batch of conventional Atlantic salmon raised at the commercial fish farm in Albany, Ind., Wednesday, June 19, 2019. AquaBounty will be producing the first genetically modified animals approved for human food in the U.S. and one way companies are pushing to transform plants and animals, as consumer advocacy groups call for greater caution. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)
June 21, 2019 - 12:11 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Inside an Indiana aquafarming complex, thousands of salmon eggs genetically modified to grow faster than normal are hatching into tiny fish. After growing to roughly 10 pounds (4.5 kilograms) in indoor tanks, they could be served in restaurants by late next year. The salmon produced...
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FILE - In this Oct. 9, 2018 file photo, an embryo receives a small dose of Cas9 protein and PCSK9 sgRNA in a microscope in a laboratory in Shenzhen in southern China's Guangdong province, during work by scientist He Jiankui's team. A report released on Monday, June 3, 2019, shows that people with a DNA mutation that reduces their chance of HIV infection have heightened overall death rate, warning that genetic tinkering can produce risks. Rasmus Nielsen of the University of California, Berkeley, senior author of the paper, acknowledged that his result cannot be applied directly to the two girls in China. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
June 03, 2019 - 10:02 am
NEW YORK (AP) — People with a DNA mutation that reduces their chance of HIV infection may die sooner, according to a study that suggests tinkering with a gene to try to fix one problem may cause others. The study authors cited the case of the Chinese researcher who tried to produce this mutation in...
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FILE - In this Oct. 9, 2018, file photo, an embryologist who was part of the team working with scientist He Jiankui adjusts a microplate containing embryos at a lab in Shenzhen in southern China’s Guandong province. Six months after He was widely scorned for helping to make the world’s first gene-edited babies, new information suggests that others may be interested in pursuing such work outside the United States. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, File)
May 28, 2019 - 7:10 pm
Six months after a Chinese scientist was widely scorned for helping to make the world's first gene-edited babies, he remains out of public view, and new information suggests that others may be interested in pursuing the same kind of work outside the United States. A fertility clinic in the United...
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