Human rights and civil liberties

FILE - In this Nov. 3, 2008, file photo, Republican presidential candidate Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., speaks at a rally in Tampa, Fla. Aide says senator, war hero and GOP presidential candidate McCain died Saturday, Aug. 25, 2018. He was 81. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)
August 25, 2018 - 11:32 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Sen. John McCain, who faced down his captors in a Vietnam prisoner of war camp with jut-jawed defiance and later turned his rebellious streak into a 35-year political career that took him to Congress and the Republican presidential nomination, died Saturday after battling brain...
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August 25, 2018 - 4:20 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal judge dealt a blow Saturday to President Donald Trump's efforts to "promote more efficient" government, ruling that key provisions of three recent executive orders "undermine federal employees' right to bargain collectively" under federal law. U.S. District Judge Ketanji...
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In this photo taken Wednesday, June 6, 2018 civil rights attorney Al McSurely sits for an interview at his home in Carthage, N.C. As the Poor People's Campaign launches a massive initiative to sign up people to support the movement and to vote, its leaders are working with the generation of civil rights activists who stood with the Rev. Martin Luther King and have continued his work. The Rev. William Barber is co-chair of the Poor People's Campaign. He says he turns to those who came before him: leaders such as the Rev. Jesse Jackson, children's advocate Marian Wright Edelman, and attorney Al McSurely. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
August 25, 2018 - 12:48 pm
CARTHAGE, N.C. (AP) — As the Poor People's Campaign launches a new initiative, its charismatic leader is working with the generation of civil rights leaders who stood by the Rev. Martin Luther King's side and continued his efforts to stamp out poverty and racism after his assassination. "The...
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In this June 30, 2018 photo, Councilwoman Marcela Huanca cries as she relates the bullying she suffered from the mayor and his family, in Escoma, Bolivia. The South American country has a high percentage of women in municipal positions, and the world's second-highest number of women in parliament, according to the United Nations. But reports of political violence against women are on the rise. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)
August 25, 2018 - 12:34 pm
ACHOCALLA, Bolivia (AP) — Few countries in the world have advanced so quickly toward gender parity in politics as has Bolivia, where women now hold almost half the seats in congress and laws mandate gender equality at lower levels too. But some male Bolivian politicians have resisted the change,...
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August 25, 2018 - 11:45 am
STOCKHOLM (AP) — More than 200 supporters of the neo-Nazi Nordic Resistance Movement have staged a rally in the Swedish capital, chanting slogans and waving the group's green-and-white flags. A six-hour rally was approved by Swedish police, who deployed a strong security presence around Stockholm's...
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August 25, 2018 - 8:18 am
BEIRUT (AP) — At least 16 children are among nearly 30 civilians kidnapped by Islamic State militants in southern Syria a month ago and are being used as a "bargaining chip" in negotiations with the Syrian government and its ally Russia, Human Rights Watch said Saturday. The rights watchdog said...
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This Thursday, April 6, 2017 photo shows Old Main on the University of Arizona campus in Tucson, Ariz. The University of Arizona has accepted hundreds of thousands of dollars in funding over the past two decades from a foundation infamous for promoting research linking race and intelligence. Records reviewed by The Associated Press show a psychology professor on the Tucson campus has received money from the Maryland-based Pioneer Fund even after other universities and organizations, including white nationalist groups, stopped receiving its support. (Ron Medvescek/Arizona Daily Star via AP)
August 24, 2018 - 7:13 pm
The University of Arizona has accepted years of funding from a foundation infamous for promoting research linking race and intelligence — even after other universities and organizations, including white nationalist groups, stopped receiving support from the group, records show. A University of...
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File-This combination of May 20, 2018, file photos shows Georgia gubernatorial candidates Stacey Abrams, left, and Brian Kemp in Atlanta. A predominantly black county in rural Georgia is facing a nationwide backlash over plans to close about 75 percent of its voting locations ahead of the November election. Officials have fired a consultant, Wednesday, Aug. 22, 2018, after widespread opposition erupted over a proposal to close most polling places in a predominantly black Georgia county, the county’s lawyer said Thursday. Randolph County lawyer Tommy Coleman gave The Associated Press a letter he sent Wednesday to consultant Mike Malone ending the contract. (AP Photos/John Amis, File)
August 24, 2018 - 1:38 pm
ATLANTA (AP) — Election officials in a majority black county in rural south Georgia took less than a minute Friday to scrap a proposal to eliminate most of the local polling places, after the plan drew criticism from all over the country. Concern about the proposal to close seven of the county's...
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August 24, 2018 - 7:54 am
CUTHBERT, Ga. (AP) — The Latest on a Georgia county's decision involving the closure of polling places (all times local): 8:50 a.m. Election officials have scrapped a widely condemned proposal to eliminate most of the polling places in a majority black Georgia county. The elections board said it...
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Eiko Kawasaki, a Korean born in Japan, speaks during an interview in Tokyo Friday, Aug. 24, 2018. Kawasaki was born in Japan and lived 43 years in North Korea before defecting. She has not seen her children, still in North Korea, for years. Kawasaki and four other defectors filed a lawsuit against North Korea’s government this week in Tokyo District Court, demanding 500 million yen, or about $5 million, in damages for human rights violations. (AP Photo/Yuri Kageyama)
August 24, 2018 - 2:45 am
TOKYO (AP) — She was one of the more than 90,000 Koreans and their relatives in Japan who went to North Korea decades ago seeking what the country promised: "paradise on earth." As North and South Korea make reconciliatory gestures and hundreds of war-separated relatives are reunited, Eiko Kawasaki...
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