Human welfare

FILE - In this Feb. 6, 1998, file photo, Mary Kay Letourneau listens to testimony during a court hearing in Seattle Letourneau, who married her former sixth-grade student after she was convicted for raping him, has died. She was 58. Her lawyer David Gehrke told news outlets Letourneau died Tuesday, July 7, 2020, of cancer. The former suburban Seattle teacher was arrested in 1997 after she became pregnant with Vili Fualaau's child. She later pleaded guilty to second-degree child rape. (Alan Berner/The Seattle Times via AP, Pool, File)
July 07, 2020 - 11:45 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Mary Kay Letourneau, a teacher who married her former sixth-grade student after she was convicted of raping him in a case that drew international headlines, has died. She was 58. Her lawyer David Gehrke told multiple news outlets Letourneau died Tuesday of cancer. He did not...
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July 07, 2020 - 9:29 pm
At least seven men forcibly restrained a teenager who had a heart attack and died two days later. The staffers at a youth facility in Michigan held down the boy's arms and legs and sat on him as he screamed that he couldn't breathe, an attorney representing the boy's estate said Tuesday...
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FILE - In this December, 1960, file photo, then President-elect John F. Kennedy, standing at center, is surrounded by members of his family in home of his parents in Hyannis Port, Mass. Standing, left to right, are Ethel Kennedy, wife of Robert Kennedy; Steven Smith and wife Jean Kennedy Smith; Robert Kennedy; Patricia Kennedy Lawford; Sargent Shriver, Joan Kennedy, wife of Edward Kennedy; and Peter Lawford. Foreground, left to right: Eunice Kennedy Shriver, Joseph P. Kennedy and wife Rose Kennedy seated in front; Jacqueline Kennedy; and Edward Kennedy. The death on Wednesday, June 17, 2020, of Jean Kennedy Smith, the last surviving sibling of President Kennedy, means Camelot's inner circle is almost gone. (AP Photo, File)
July 07, 2020 - 7:01 am
NEW YORK (AP) — The late Sargent Shriver, the Peace Corps' founding director and an architect of President Lyndon Johnson's “War on Poverty,” left behind at least one unfinished project. RosettaBooks announced Tuesday that it had acquired Shriver's memoir “We Called It a War,” which he worked on in...
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FILE - In this July 11, 2019, file photo, Assemblywoman Autumn Burke, D-Inglewood, calls on lawmakers to approve a wildfire measure she co-authored, with Assemblyman Chris Holden, D-Pasadena, and Assemblyman Chad Mayes, R-Yucca Valley, before the Assembly in Sacramento, Calif. A coronavirus outbreak in the California Legislature has indefinitely delayed the state Assembly's return to work from a scheduled summer recess. Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon's office confirmed five people who work in the Assembly have tested positive for the coronavirus. They include Burke, who is believed to have contracted the virus while on the Assembly floor last month. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
July 06, 2020 - 9:20 pm
PHOENIX — The number of confirmed coronavirus cases in Arizona has now surpassed 100,000 and younger people, not the elderly, have comprised more than half of them, state health officials said Monday. The Department of Health Services said in a statement that more than 62,000 of the 101,441...
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In this image provided by the Freedom Initiative Mohamed Amashah is greeted by family members upon arrival at Dulles International Airport in Dulles, Va., on Monday, July 6, 2020. The American medical student detained without trial in an Egyptian prison for nearly 500 days has been freed and returned to the United States, the U.S. State Department said on Monday. (Bushra Soltan/Freedom Initiative via AP)
July 06, 2020 - 6:30 pm
CAIRO (AP) — An American medical student detained without trial in an Egyptian prison for nearly 500 days has been freed and returned to the United States, the U.S. State Department said on Monday. The release of Mohamed Amashah, a dual Egyptian-American citizen from Jersey City, New Jersey,...
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This photo provided by WROC-TV shows the remnants of a Frederick Douglass statue ripped from its base at a park in Rochester, N.Y., Sunday, July 5, 2020. The statue of abolitionist Douglass was ripped on the anniversary of one of his most famous speeches, delivered in that city in 1852. (Ben Densieski/WROC-TV via AP)
July 06, 2020 - 11:05 am
ROCHESTER, N.Y. (AP) — A statue of abolitionist Frederick Douglass was ripped from its base in Rochester on the anniversary of one of his most famous speeches, delivered in that city in 1852. Police said the statue of Douglass was taken on Sunday from Maplewood Park, a site along the Underground...
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Medical personnel prepare to test hundreds of people lined up in vehicles Saturday, June 27, 2020, in Phoenix's western neighborhood of Maryvalefor free COVID-19 tests organized by Equality Health Foundation, which focuses on care in underserved communities. As coronavirus infections explode in states like Arizona and Florida, people in communities of color are fighting to get tested. Public health experts say wider testing helps people in underserved neighborhoods and is key to controlling a pandemic. (AP Photo/Matt York)
July 06, 2020 - 8:53 am
PHOENIX (AP) — A Latino cook whose co-worker got COVID-19 waited in his truck for a free swab at a rare testing event in a low-income neighborhood in Phoenix. A Hispanic tile installer queued up after two weeks of self-isolation while his father battled the coronavirus in intensive care. He didn't...
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A passenger has her temperature checked to prevent the spread of the new coronavirus as some routes for the Traditional Jeepney buses were opened to help public transportation while the government slowly eases lockdown in metropolitan Manila, Philippines on Friday, July 3, 2020. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)
July 05, 2020 - 10:15 pm
SYDNEY, Australia — The leader of Australia’s most populous state says her government’s decision to close its border with hard-hit Victoria state marks a new phase in the country’s coronavirus pandemic. New South Wales Premier Gladys Berejiklian has long been a critic of states that close their...
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In this June 5, 2020 photo provided by the Mountain Area Health Education Center, physicians, residents and staff from the facility in Asheville, N.C., take a knee to show support for renewed calls for racial justice after the police killing of George Floyd. Government statistics from late January through May 30 suggest an increase in U.S. deaths from chronic diseases compared with historical trends. They include 7,000 excess deaths from hypertension, about 4,000 from diabetes and 3,000 from strokes -- all conditions that disproportionately affect Blacks, although the data don’t include race. (Brenda Benik/MAHEC via AP)
July 05, 2020 - 9:07 am
Doctors have known it for a long time, well before the resounding cries of “Black Lives Matter”: Black people suffer disproportionately. They face countless challenges to good health, among them food, transportation and income. The stress of living with racism has very real, physical effects. And...
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A car stands vertically on a muddy road after being washed away by flood, in Hitoyoshi, Kumamoto prefecture, southwestern Japan, Sunday, July 5, 2020. Heavy rain in the Kumamoto region triggered flooding and mudslides Saturday and left dozens still being stranded at their homes and other facilities. (Kyodo News via AP)
July 05, 2020 - 6:11 am
TOKYO (AP) — Deep floodwaters and the risk of more mudslides that left at least 34 people confirmed or presumed dead hampered search and rescue operations Sunday in southern Japan, including at elderly home facilities where more than a dozen died and scores were still stranded. Helicopters and...
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