Insects

This 2018 photo provided by the University of New Hampshire shows a ground nesting bee pollinating a flower in New Hampshire. The species is one of 14 declining wild bee species identified in a study published in April 2019 by researchers at the university. The new study has found that more than a dozen wild bee species critical to pollinating fruits and vegetables across New England are on the decline. (University of New Hampshire/Molly Jacobson via AP)
April 18, 2019 - 10:25 am
CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — More than a dozen wild bee species critical to pollinating everything from blueberries to apples in New England are on the decline, according to a new study. Researchers from the University of New Hampshire wanted to understand if the documented declines hitting honeybees and...
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FILE - In this undated file photo provided by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a blacklegged tick, also known as a deer tick, rests on a plant. Non-native ticks, including some with significant veterinary and medical importance, are showing up in Alaska and health officials fear a warmer climate may allow them to become established. A collaborative project between the University of Alaska and state wildlife and veterinary officials is working to understand the risk of non-native ticks such as blacklegged ticks and pathogens they could carry. (CDC via AP, File)
April 17, 2019 - 5:08 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Health and wildlife officials are taking steps to prepare for potentially dangerous parasites that could gain a foothold because of Alaska's warming climate. Non-native ticks represent a threat to wildlife and people because they can carry and transmit pathogens, said Micah...
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A staff of the Philippine Department of Environment and Natural Resources shows one of the 757 Tarantulas kept inside plastic containers at their office in metropolitan Manila, Philippines on Wednesday, April 3, 2019. Philippine Customs District Collector Carmelita Talusan said in a statement that 757 live Tarantulas, with an estimated value of P310,000 (about US$6,000), were seized by customs agents at Manila's airport last April 1. The endangered wildlife species were found concealed in gift-wrapped oatmeal and cookie boxes and was shipped from Poland. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)
April 03, 2019 - 3:19 am
MANILA, Philippines (AP) — Philippine customs officials were astonished when they opened nicely gift-wrapped boxes of cookies and oatmeal flown in all the way from Poland and found a hair-raising contraband: hundreds of live tarantulas. Bureau of Customs personnel seized the 757 tarantulas at a...
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This Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019 photo shows male mosquitos at the the Vosshall Laboratory at Rockefeller University in New York. In 2018, researchers at the lab published a much-improved description of the DNA code for a particularly dangerous species of mosquito: Aedes aegypti, notorious for spreading Zika, dengue and yellow fever. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
March 29, 2019 - 10:25 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Just about every week, it seems, scientists publish the unique DNA code of some creature or plant. Just in February, they published the genome for the strawberry, the paper mulberry tree, the great white shark and the Antarctic blackfin icefish. They also announced that, thanks to a...
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A Monarch butterfly rests on the finger of a woman in the Amanalco de Becerra sanctuary, on the mountains near the extinct Nevado de Toluca volcano, in Mexico, Thursday, Feb. 14, 2019. The monarch butterfly population, like that of other insects, fluctuates widely depending on a variety of factors, but scientists say the recoveries after each big dip tend to be smaller, suggesting an overall declining trend. (AP Photo/ Marco Ugarte)
February 15, 2019 - 2:43 pm
AMANALCO DE BECERRA, Mexico (AP) — For years, park rangers and conservationists working around Mexico's Nevado de Toluca volcano chased rumors of a monarch butterfly colony that wintered high in a forest of oyamel firs in some corner of the 132,000-acre (53,419-hectare) national reserve. Local...
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February 14, 2019 - 7:32 am
EL PASO, Texas (AP) — Not in the Valentine's Day spirit? A Texas zoo has a cockroach that can help. The El Paso Zoo is running a promotion called "Quit Bugging Me" that allows people to name cockroaches after ex-spouses, former friends or anyone else on the nope list. On Thursday, the cockroaches...
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FILE- In this Aug. 19, 2015 photo, Tom Merriman stands behind a monarch in his butterfly atrium at his nursery in Vista, Calif. Researchers with an environmental group are labeling as "disturbingly low" the number of western monarch butterflies that migrate along the California coast. A recent count by the Xerces Society recorded fewer than 30,000 butterflies, which it says is an 86 percent decline since 2017. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull, File)
January 06, 2019 - 2:27 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Researchers with an environmental group have labeled as "disturbingly low" the number of western monarch butterflies that migrate along the California coast. A recent count by the Xerces Society recorded fewer than 30,000 butterflies, which it said is an 86 percent decline...
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November 22, 2018 - 3:59 pm
OTTAWA, Ontario (AP) — Jose Bautista has a new namesake buzzing around. Entomologist Bob Anderson of the Canadian Museum of Nature has dubbed a newly discovered species of beetle Sicoderus bautistai after the former Toronto Blue Jays star. Anderson decided to name the insect — known as a weevil for...
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October 04, 2018 - 8:55 am
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — A North Carolina family returned from a three-day trip to find their car parked at the airport had been possessed by a colony of ants. The Charlotte Observer reports Caroline Tedder Hacker lodged a complaint on Facebook on Sunday, warning people not to park in a certain...
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FILE - In this May 26, 2010 file photo, a Coccinellidae, more commonly known as a ladybug or ladybird beetle, rests on the petals of a rose in Portland, Ore. A study estimates a 14 percent decline in ladybugs in the United States and Canada from 1987 to 2006. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)
September 20, 2018 - 12:06 am
OXFORD, Pa. (AP) — A staple of summer — swarms of bugs — seems to be a thing of the past. And that's got scientists worried. Pesky mosquitoes, disease-carrying ticks, crop-munching aphids and cockroaches are doing just fine. But the more beneficial flying insects of summer — native bees, moths,...
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