Judicial appointments and nominations

FILE - In this Nov. 10, 2011, file photo Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas laughs while talking with other guests at The Federalist Society's 2011 Annual Dinner in Washington. Thomas is now the longest-serving member of a court that has recently gotten more conservative, putting him in a unique and potentially powerful position, and he’s said he isn’t going away anytime soon. With President Donald Trump’s nominees Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh now on the court, conservatives are firmly in control as the justices take on divisive issues such as abortion, gun control and LGBT rights.(AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)
May 04, 2019 - 11:34 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Clarence Thomas has been a Supreme Court justice for nearly three decades. It may finally be his moment. Many Americans know Thomas largely from his bruising 1991 confirmation hearing, when he was accused of sexual harassment charges by former employee Anita Hill — charges he...
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April 30, 2019 - 6:41 pm
MADISON, Wis. (AP) — A divided Wisconsin Supreme Court on Tuesday restored 82 appointees of then-Gov. Scott Walker who were confirmed during a lame duck legislative session, handing a victory to Republicans and defeat to Democratic Gov. Tony Evers. The 4-3 order affects 15 of the appointees who...
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This image released by ABC shows Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden, center, with co-hosts, Ana Navarro, left, and Sunny Hostin during an appearance on "The View," Friday, April 26, 2019. (Lorenzo Bevilaqua/ABC via AP)
April 29, 2019 - 3:54 pm
Former Vice President Joe Biden said Monday that he takes responsibility for the fact that Anita Hill was "not treated well" in 1991 when she accused then-Supreme Court-nominee Clarence Thomas of sexual harassment and Biden led the Senate Judiciary Committee. "I believed her from the very beginning...
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FILE - In a Dec. 15, 2013 file photo, Senior Judge for the U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals Damon Keith speaks about Nelson Mandela, in Detroit. Keith, a federal judge famous for being sued President Richard Nixon and an iconic national figure in the civil rights movement died Sunday, April 28, 2019, according to Swanson Funeral Home in Detroit. He was 96.(Ricardo Thomas/Detroit News via AP, File)
April 28, 2019 - 12:47 pm
DETROIT (AP) — Judge Damon J. Keith, a grandson of slaves and revered figure in the civil rights movement who as a federal judge was sued by President Richard Nixon over a ruling against warrantless wiretaps, died Sunday. He was 96. Keith died in Detroit, the city where the prominent lawyer was...
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FILE - In this Jan. 23, 2017 file photo, Roe v. Wade protesters sing the national anthem to mark the 1973 Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion nationwide in Topeka, Kan. The Kansas Supreme Court on Friday, April 26, 2019, ruled for the first time that the state constitution protects abortion rights and has blocked a first-in-the-nation ban on a common second trimester procedure. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner, File)
April 26, 2019 - 4:56 pm
TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — Kansas' highest court declared for the first time Friday that the state constitution protects abortion rights, a sweeping ruling that blocks a ban on a common second trimester method for ending pregnancies and endangers other restrictions as well. The state Supreme Court's...
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FILE - In this Feb. 3, 2018 file photo, John Singleton arrives at the 70th annual Directors Guild of America Awards in Beverly Hills, Calif. The "Boyz N the Hood" director suffered a stroke last week and remains hospitalized, according to a statement from his family on Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP)
April 26, 2019 - 4:42 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — The daughter of "Boyz N the Hood" director John Singleton disputed his mother's account that he's in a coma in a court filing Friday, saying that he's recovering from an April 17 stroke. Cleopatra Singleton, 19, said in the declaration filed in Los Angeles Superior Court that...
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Attorney General William Barr speaks alongside Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein about the release of a redacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller's report during a news conference, Thursday, April 18, 2019, at the Department of Justice in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
April 26, 2019 - 11:59 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein is taking swipes at his critics as he prepares to leave the Justice Department, using one of his final speeches to defend his handling of the special counsel's Russia investigation and condemn decisions made before he took the job. Rosenstein...
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Former Vice President and Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden arrives at the Wilmington train station Thursday April 25, 2019 in Wilmington, Delaware. Biden announced his candidacy for president via video on Thursday morning. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)
April 26, 2019 - 2:06 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former Vice President Joe Biden's 2020 presidential bid (all times local): 9:05 p.m. Former Vice President Joe Biden says the events in Charlottesville were an "epiphany" to him because he had never seen anything like it in his lifetime. Video of Biden's remarks on...
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Rep. Carolyn Maloney, D-N.Y., center, joined from left by Dale Ho, attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union, and New York State Attorney General Letitia James, speaks to reporters after the Supreme Court heard arguments over the Trump administration's plan to ask about citizenship on the 2020 census, in Washington, Tuesday, April 23, 2019. Critics say adding the question would discourage many immigrants from being counted, leading to an inaccurate count. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
April 23, 2019 - 12:58 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court's conservative majority seemed ready Tuesday to uphold the Trump administration's plan to ask about citizenship on the 2020 census , despite evidence that millions of Hispanics and immigrants could go uncounted. There appeared to be a clear divide between the...
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FILE - This undated booking photo provided by the Alexandria Sheriff's Office, in Virginia, shows Chelsea Manning. A federal appeals court on Monday, April 22, 2109, rejected a bid by former Army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning to be released from jail for refusing to testify to a grand jury investigating Wikileaks. (Alexandria Sheriff's Office via AP, File)
April 22, 2019 - 10:40 am
FALLS CHURCH, Va. (AP) — A federal appeals court on Monday rejected a bid by former Army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning to be released from jail for refusing to testify to a grand jury investigating Wikileaks. The three-paragraph, unanimous decision from a three-judge panel of the 4th U.S...
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