Law and order

FILE - This March 28, 2017, file photo, provided by the New York State Sex Offender Registry, shows Jeffrey Epstein. The will that Epstein signed just two days before his jailhouse suicide on Aug. 10, 2019, puts more than $577 million in assets in a trust fund that could make it more difficult for his dozens of accusers to collect damages. (New York State Sex Offender Registry via AP, File)
August 22, 2019 - 3:49 am
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — The will that Jeffrey Epstein signed just two days before his jailhouse suicide puts more than $577 million in assets into a trust fund that could make it more difficult for his dozens of accusers to collect damages. Estate lawyers and other experts say prying open the...
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In this undated photo provided by the Florida Department of Corrections, Gary Ray Bowles is shown. Bowles is scheduled to be executed by lethal injection at Florida State Prison on Thursday, Aug. 22, 2019, for the murder of Walter Hinton in Jacksonville Beach in November 1994. (Florida Department of Corrections via AP)
August 22, 2019 - 12:06 am
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — A serial killer who preyed on older, gay men during a spree that left six dead on or near the U.S. East Coast 25 years ago is set to be executed at a Florida prison. Fifty-seven-year-old Gary Ray Bowles is set to receive a lethal injection Thursday evening, convicted of the...
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This undated photo provided by the Texas Department of Criminal Justice shows Larry Swearingen. Swearingen, a Texas death row inmate who has long maintained his innocence, is facing execution for the abduction, rape and murder of a suburban Houston community college student more than 20 years earlier. Swearingen is set to receive a lethal injection Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2019, for the December 1998 killing of 19-year-old Melissa Trotter. (Texas Department of Criminal Justice via AP)
August 21, 2019 - 8:16 pm
HUNTSVILLE, Texas (AP) — A Texas death row inmate who argued that his conviction was based on junk science was executed Wednesday for the abduction, rape and killing of a suburban Houston community college student more than 20 years ago. Larry Swearingen, 48, received a lethal injection at the...
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This photo shows the West Virginia governor’s mansion on Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2019, in Charleston, W.Va. A persistent lawsuit is drawing on the state constitution in an effort to force Republican Gov. Jim Justice to live at the governor’s mansion. Democratic Del. Isaac Sponaugle filed the case and accuses Justice of violating a passage in the state Constitution that says the governor “shall reside at the seat of government.” The result has been a long legal back and forth centered on the definition of the word reside. A judge requested more documents from both sides after a brief court hearing Wednesday. (AP Photo/Anthony Izaguirre)
August 21, 2019 - 8:15 pm
CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — Can a governor be forced to live in the state capital? A lawsuit seeking to do just that with West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice was back in court Wednesday. The Republican billionaire has drawn frequent criticism from members of both major parties for being absent from the...
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FILE - A 2015 file photo shows West Virginia Bishop Michael J. Bransfield, then-bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Wheeling-Charleston. A lawsuit accusing Bransfield of molesting boys and men has been settled. The terms of the recent settlement are confidential, Wheeling-Charleston Diocese spokesman Tim Bishop said in a statement, Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2019. The diocese declined further comment. (Scott McCloskey/The Intelligencer via AP, File)
August 21, 2019 - 5:48 pm
CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — A lawsuit accusing the former bishop of West Virginia's Roman Catholic diocese of molesting boys and men has been settled. The terms of the recent settlement are confidential, Wheeling-Charleston Diocese spokesman Tim Bishop said in a statement. The diocese declined further...
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FILE - In this May 13, 2019 file photo provided by the National Park Service is a female condor in Zion National Park, Utah. Seven environmental and animal protection groups have filed the first lawsuit challenging the Trump administration's recent rollbacks to the Endangered Species Act. Their lawsuit filed Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2019, in federal court in San Francisco comes after the federal government announced last week it was rescinding some protections for wildlife. (National Park Service via AP, File)
August 21, 2019 - 5:42 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Seven environmental and animal protection groups have filed the first lawsuit challenging the Trump administration's recent rollbacks to the Endangered Species Act. Their lawsuit filed Wednesday in federal court in San Francisco comes after the federal government announced last...
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Former Philadelphia Police Commissioner Richard Ross speaks with the media outside Police Administration Building at 8th and Race in Philadelphia, Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2019. Ross abruptly resigned Tuesday, a day after a woman in the department claimed in a lawsuit that he allegedly ignored her claim of another officer's sexual harassment. (Jessica Griffin/The Philadelphia Inquirer via AP)
August 21, 2019 - 5:04 pm
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Two female police officers whose sexual harassment lawsuit led Philadelphia's police commissioner to resign have received promises from the city they won't be retaliated against or endure more transfers while the case plays out. Cpl. Audra McCowan and Patrol Officer Jennifer...
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FILE - In this Feb. 1, 2016, file photo, novelist Nicholas Sparks attends a special screening in Los Angeles. The trial is getting underway, Wednesday, Aug. 14, 2019, in a lawsuit that accuses Sparks of defaming the former headmaster of a private Christian school he founded in North Carolina. (Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP, File)
August 21, 2019 - 4:19 pm
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — A federal jury sided Wednesday with novelist Nicholas Sparks and the private Christian school he founded in his North Carolina hometown, dismissing claims by the school's former headmaster that he was unjustly fired and then slandered by the author. Jurors spent about three...
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FILE - In this Oct. 13, 2017, file photo, Lamonte McIntyre, left, who was imprisoned for 23 years for a 1994 double murder in Kansas that he always said he didn't commit, walks out of a courthouse in Kansas City, Kan., with his mother, Rosie McIntyre, after Wyandotte County District Attorney Mark A. Dupree, Sr. dropped the charges. Kansas is fighting McIntyre's compensation claim for the years spent behind bars before a court vacated his convictions. McIntyre's case was one of three that helped prompt the state last year to allow the wrongfully convicted to seek compensation from it. (Tammy Ljungblad /The Kansas City Star via AP, File)
August 21, 2019 - 4:18 pm
WICHITA, Kan. (AP) — Kansas is fighting the compensation claim of a man who spent 23 years in prison for a double homicide before a judge vacated his convictions, which were secured despite a complete lack of physical evidence and motive tying him to the crimes. Lamonte McIntyre's case was one of...
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August 21, 2019 - 12:08 pm
LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) — Nebraska's largest prison faces "alarming" conditions driven by staffing shortages, record overtime and inmates who are secretly using synthetic drugs and contraband cellphones, according to the state's watchdog for correctional services. The state's Inspector General of...
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