Law enforcement technology

New York City Police Dept. Chief Robert Lukach, background center, and Capt. Ronald Zedalis, left, negotiate with Sgt. Kenneth O'Brien portraying a barricaded person during a tactical demonstration at New York City Emergency Service Unit headquarters at Floyd Bennett Field in New York, on Thursday, March 28, 2019. In 2019, the department started training all 35,000 officers in a technique of using a length of rope to secure the door of a home where a distressed person is threatening harm, temporarily trapping them until backup arrives. The rope makes it virtually impossible for the person inside to burst through the door and cause harm. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
April 04, 2019 - 12:51 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — The New York Police Department has all the latest crime-fighting tools: body cameras, algorithms, even drones. But it is now widely deploying a far simpler technology, a 5½-foot (1½-meter) piece of rope, to help officers deal with one of the diciest kinds of calls. The department...
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FILE - In this May 10, 2017 file photo, Ben Lieberman poses for a photo at his home in Chappaqua, N.Y. Lieberman, whose 19-year-old son died in a crash involving distracted driving, is urging support for a legislative proposal that would make Nevada the first state in the U.S. to allow police to use prototype technology to find out if a person was using a cellphone during a car crash. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson, File)
March 17, 2019 - 9:44 am
CARSON CITY, Nev. (AP) — Most states ban texting behind the wheel, but a legislative proposal could make Nevada one of the first states to allow police to use a contentious technology to find out if a person was using a cellphone during a car crash. The measure is igniting privacy concerns and has...
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In this Feb. 11, 2019 photo, Rebecca Shutt, who works in the New York Police Department's Office of Crime Control Strategies, poses for a photo in New York. Shutt utilizes a software called Patternizr, which allows crime analysts to compare robbery, larceny and theft incidents to the millions of crimes logged in the NYPD's database, aiding their hunt for crime patterns. It's much faster than the old method, which involved analysts sifting through reports and racking their brains for similar incidents. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
March 10, 2019 - 12:34 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — When a syringe-wielding drill thief tried sticking up a Home Depot near Yankee Stadium, police figured out quickly that it wasn't a one-off. A man had also used a syringe a few weeks earlier while stealing a drill at another Home Depot 7 miles (11 kilometers) south in Manhattan. The...
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FILE - In this Feb. 17, 2016, file photo an iPhone is seen in Washington. A new watchdog report has found that U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers are searching the electronic devices of travelers more often and did not always follow proper protocol. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)
December 10, 2018 - 2:14 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A new watchdog report has found that U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers are searching the electronic devices of travelers more often, and are not always following proper protocol. The report made public Monday found there were 29,000 devices searched at a port of entry in...
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In this Oct. 31, 2018, photo, Huang Yongzhen, CEO of Watrix, demonstrates the use of his firm's gait recognition software at his company's offices in Beijing. A Chinese technology startup hopes to begin selling software that recognizes people by their body shape and how they walk, enabling identification when faces are hidden from cameras. Already used by police on the streets of Beijing and Shanghai, “gait recognition” is part of a major push to develop artificial-intelligence and data-driven surveillance across China, raising concern about how far the technology will go. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
November 06, 2018 - 6:58 am
BEIJING (AP) — Chinese authorities have begun deploying a new surveillance tool: "gait recognition" software that uses people's body shapes and how they walk to identify them, even when their faces are hidden from cameras. Already used by police on the streets of Beijing and Shanghai, "gait...
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In this photo taken Friday, Aug. 17 2018, police search a suspect for guns and drugs during a raid on a known drug house in Mannenburg, Cape Town, South Africa. As gunshots ring out in one of South Africa’s most dangerous neighborhoods, a new technology detects the gun’s location and immediately alerts police. (AP Photo/Nasief Manie)
September 13, 2018 - 5:04 am
CAPE TOWN, South Africa (AP) — As gunshots ring out in one of South Africa's most dangerous neighborhoods, a new technology detects the gun's location and immediately alerts police. South Africa is the first country outside the United States to implement the "shotspotter" audio technology, which is...
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