Law enforcement technology

December 19, 2019 - 2:13 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A study by a U.S. agency has found that facial recognition technology often performs unevenly based on a person's race, gender or age. This is the first time the National Institute of Standards and Technology has investigated demographic differences in how face-scanning algorithms...
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FILE - In this July 16, 2019, file photo, Ernie Field pushes the doorbell on his Ring doorbell camera at his home in Wolcott, Conn. Amazon says it has considered adding facial recognition technology to its Ring doorbell cameras. The company said in a letter released Tuesday, Nov. 19 by U.S. Sen. Ed Markey that facial recognition is a “contemplated, but unreleased feature” of its home security cameras. The Massachusetts Democrat wrote to Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos in September raising privacy and civil liberty concerns about Ring’s video-sharing partnerships with hundreds of police departments around the country. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File)
November 19, 2019 - 7:33 pm
Amazon has considered adding facial recognition technology to its Ring doorbell cameras, according to a letter to a U.S. senator defending its video-sharing partnerships with police. The company told Sen. Ed Markey that facial recognition is a “contemplated, but unreleased feature” of its home...
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October 09, 2019 - 7:47 am
THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — The European Union police agency says cybercriminals are using new technology and exploiting existing online vulnerabilities as they shift their focus to larger and more profitable targets. Europol says data is a key target for criminals "so data security and consumer...
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August 29, 2019 - 11:52 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department's inspector general says a former deputy assistant attorney general resigned after admitting watching pornography on their government computer. The watchdog released a summary of the investigation Thursday. The official isn't identified in the inspector...
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An investigator bags a suspicious package as evidence after it was thought to be an explosive device in Manhattan's Chelsea neighborhood Friday, Aug. 16, 2019, in New York. The scare happened about two hours after two abandoned objects that looked like pressure cookers prompted an evacuation of a major transit hub in lower Manhattan. The police bomb squad later determined they were not explosives. (AP Photo/Kevin Hagen).
August 16, 2019 - 12:07 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Three abandoned devices that looked like pressure cookers caused an evacuation of a major New York City subway station and closed off an intersection in another part of town Friday morning before police determined the objects were not explosives. Police were looking to talk to a man...
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U.S. Attorney General William Barr addresses the International Conference on Cyber Security, hosted by the FBI and Fordham University, at Fordham University in New York, Tuesday, July 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
July 23, 2019 - 11:29 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Attorney General William Barr said Tuesday that increased encryption of data on phones and computers and encrypted messaging apps are putting American security at risk. Barr's comments at a cybersecurity conference mark a continuing effort by the Justice Department to push tech...
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FILE - This May 8, 2017 file photo provided by his family shows Luke Patterson. Patterson was shot and killed by a New York State Trooper on May 23, 2019, while walking alone along the shoulder of a highway. The trooper said he refused to stop and made a sudden move, but there is no video record of the encounter because New York remains one of five states where the primary state law enforcement agency does not have dashboard cameras. (Patterson Family Photo via AP, File)
July 22, 2019 - 9:16 am
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — A highway shoulder is where New York state troopers spotted Luke Patterson, walking by himself around 2 a.m. after his car became disabled. By the end of the encounter in rural New York, the 41-year-old chef would be killed by a trooper's gunfire. Authorities say the trooper...
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FILE - In this April 10, 2019, file photo, Regina Wells, foreground right, a forensic laboratories supervisor with the Kentucky State Police, demonstrates new crime-fighting technology in Frankfort, Ky. Rapid DNA machines roughly the size of an office printer have helped solve rape cases in Kentucky. Now a state board in Texas has asked a growing government provider of the DNA equipment used in those high-profile projects to halt work amid concerns of potentially jeopardized criminal cases, according to a letter obtained by The Associated Press. (AP Photo/Bruce Schreiner, File)
June 20, 2019 - 12:22 am
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — With a name that sounds like futuristic fiction, Rapid DNA machines roughly the size of an office printer have helped solve rape cases in Kentucky, identified California wildfire victims and verified family connections of migrants at the U.S.-Mexico border. Now a state board in...
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FILE - In this Oct. 31, 2018, file photo, a man, who declined to be identified, has his face painted to represent efforts to defeat facial recognition during a protest at Amazon headquarters over the company's facial recognition system, "Rekognition," in Seattle. San Francisco is on track to become the first U.S. city to ban the use of facial recognition by police and other city agencies as the technology creeps increasingly into daily life. Studies have shown error rates in facial-analysis systems built by Amazon, IBM and Microsoft were far higher for darker-skinned women than lighter-skinned men. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
May 14, 2019 - 8:32 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — San Francisco supervisors voted Tuesday to ban the use of facial recognition software by police and other city departments, becoming the first U.S. city to outlaw a rapidly developing technology that has alarmed privacy and civil liberties advocates. The ban is part of broader...
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April 29, 2019 - 12:35 pm
LONDON (AP) — Police in England and Wales are distributing consent forms urging victims of sexual assault and other crimes to turn over access to mobile phones and other electronic devices or risk having their cases dropped. The National Police Chiefs' Council said Monday that police will only seek...
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