Moose

FILE - In this undated file photo provided by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a blacklegged tick, also known as a deer tick, rests on a plant. Non-native ticks, including some with significant veterinary and medical importance, are showing up in Alaska and health officials fear a warmer climate may allow them to become established. A collaborative project between the University of Alaska and state wildlife and veterinary officials is working to understand the risk of non-native ticks such as blacklegged ticks and pathogens they could carry. (CDC via AP, File)
April 17, 2019 - 5:08 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Health and wildlife officials are taking steps to prepare for potentially dangerous parasites that could gain a foothold because of Alaska's warming climate. Non-native ticks represent a threat to wildlife and people because they can carry and transmit pathogens, said Micah...
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The Supreme Court building is seen on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March 26, 2019. The Supreme Court is returning to arguments over whether the political task of redistricting can be overly partisan. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
March 26, 2019 - 2:27 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The National Park Service improperly banned an Alaska moose hunter from using a hovercraft on a river through a national preserve, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Tuesday in a unanimous decision. The court limited the National Park Service's authority to enforce laws and...
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March 11, 2019 - 6:30 pm
KEYSTONE, Colo. (AP) — Rescuers in Colorado hauled a bull moose to safety after it became trapped in a window well. Summit Daily reported Sunday that rescuers first tranquilized the animal Saturday night before attempting a rescue from the five-foot-deep (about 1.5 m) enclosure at a private home...
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January 28, 2019 - 11:27 am
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — Scientists are rushing to salvage a study of wolves and moose at Isle Royale National Park now that the government shutdown is over. Biologists and support personnel typically spend seven weeks every winter on the Lake Superior island, observing how the predator and prey...
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FILE - This Sept. 26, 2018 file photo provided by the National Park Service shows a 4-year-old female gray wolf emerging from her cage at Isle Royale National Park in Michigan. Environmental research projects on endangered animals and air and water quality are being delayed and disrupted by the monthlong partial federal government shutdown and not just those conducted by government agencies. (National Park Service via AP, File)
January 24, 2019 - 10:38 am
The rainwater collection system is broken at the environmental research station on a remote, rocky Pacific island off the California coast. So is a crane used to hoist small boats in and out of the water. A two-year supply of diesel fuel for the power generators is almost gone. U.S. Fish and...
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January 08, 2019 - 3:50 am
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — A moose wandered into a hospital building in Alaska's largest city Monday — and Stephanie Hupton was ready to capture the visit with her phone camera. Hupton works in billing at a physical therapy office inside a building attached to Alaska Regional Hospital in Anchorage...
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FILE - This Sept. 26, 2018, file photo provided by the National Park Service shows a 4-year-old female gray wolf emerging from her cage at Isle Royale National Park in Michigan. A gray wolf relocated from the Minnesota mainland to Isle Royale National Park this fall has died. The male wolf was among four taken to the Lake Superior island park as part of a multi-year effort to rebuild its declining wolf population. The other three relocated wolves are doing well. (National Park Service via AP, File)
November 13, 2018 - 4:56 pm
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — A gray wolf relocated this fall from mainland Minnesota to Isle Royale National Park has died of unknown causes, officials said Tuesday, a minor setback in a multiyear plan to rebuild the predator species on the Lake Superior archipelago. The 5-year-old male was among...
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Alaska resident John Sturgeon walks outside the Supreme Court, Monday, Nov. 5, 2018 in Washington. Sturgeon sued the Park Service 2011 after it told him to stop operating his hovercraft on a stretch of the Nation river that passes through the federally created preserve. The State of Alaska would permit this, but the National Park Services regulations said he could not. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
November 05, 2018 - 1:05 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court sounded skeptical Monday of the National Park Service's authority to prevent an Alaskan moose hunter from using his motorized rubber boat to access remote areas of the state. The justices heard arguments in a case that tests the limits of the federal government's...
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