Parks

FILE - In this Aug. 10, 2005, file photo, tourist Chris Farthing from Suffolks County, England, takes a picture while visiting Chaco Culture National Historical Park in northwestern New Mexico. The Bureau of Land Management has rescheduled an oil and gas lease sale for March 28, 2019, that includes several parcels that are within 10 miles of the park. The agency says the sale was pushed back to accommodate a public protest period that was delayed due to the recent government shutdown. (AP Photo/Jeff Geissler, File)
January 31, 2019 - 6:32 am
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — U.S. land managers will move forward in March with the sale of oil and gas leases that include land near Chaco Culture National Historical Park and other sites sacred to Native American tribes. The sale comes as Democratic members of Congress, tribal leaders and...
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January 28, 2019 - 11:27 am
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — Scientists are rushing to salvage a study of wolves and moose at Isle Royale National Park now that the government shutdown is over. Biologists and support personnel typically spend seven weeks every winter on the Lake Superior island, observing how the predator and prey...
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FILE - This Sept. 2, 2010 file photo shows a woman walking along the beach in Frisco, N.C. on Hatteras Island. Park rangers were once again greeting visitors at some national parks across the United States and flight operations at major airports were returning to normal on Saturday, one day after a partial government shutdown came to an end. The National Park Service said it was working on reopening all of its parks as quickly as possible, but some parks may not open immediately depending on their staff size and complexity. The Virgin Islands National Park, Cape Hatteras National Seashore, the Wright Brothers National Memorial and the Great Smoky Mountains National Park were among the parks that reopened Saturday, Jan. 26, 2019. Grand Canyon National Park issued a statement saying it would be fully operational this week. (Steve Earley/The Virginian-Pilot via AP, File)
January 27, 2019 - 5:42 am
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Park rangers were once again greeting visitors at some national parks across the United States and flight operations at major airports were returning to normal on Saturday, one day after a partial government shutdown came to an end. While there were signs that some government...
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January 26, 2019 - 4:48 pm
YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, Wyo. (AP) — Yellowstone National Park officials say visitor centers will reopen by Sunday afternoon as the longest government shutdown in U.S. history ends. Park officials said in a statement Saturday that entrance fees also will be charged starting Sunday. Officials said...
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The signature of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., is visible on a deal to reopen the government on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, Jan. 25, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
January 26, 2019 - 4:11 pm
What's up now that the partial government shutdown ended after 35 days: WHAT'S NEW Park rangers were once again greeting visitors at some national parks across the United States and flight operations at major airports were returning to normal on Saturday, one day after a partial government shutdown...
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January 25, 2019 - 9:35 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — With the longest shutdown in U.S. history officially over, here's a look at how the federal government will get back to regular business: ___ WHEN WILL FEDERAL WORKERS GET PAID? It's unclear at this time. The White House tweeted that it will be "in the coming days." Some 800,000...
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FILE- In this Jan. 9, 2019, file photo Michael Northern, vice president of WJP Restaurant Group, stands next to an empty table at dinnertime at Rocket City Tavern near numerous federal agencies in Huntsville, Ala. Businesses that count heavily on federal employees as customers are feeling the punishing effects of the government shutdown. Northern said business is down 35 percent. “People are just going home and nesting, trying to conserve resources,” said Northern. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)
January 24, 2019 - 5:35 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — From power restaurants in Washington and a belt-buckle maker in Colorado to a brewery in California, businesses that count heavily on federal employees as customers are feeling the punishing effects of the government shutdown. In many cases, it's forcing them to cut workers' hours...
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FILE - This Sept. 26, 2018 file photo provided by the National Park Service shows a 4-year-old female gray wolf emerging from her cage at Isle Royale National Park in Michigan. Environmental research projects on endangered animals and air and water quality are being delayed and disrupted by the monthlong partial federal government shutdown and not just those conducted by government agencies. (National Park Service via AP, File)
January 24, 2019 - 10:38 am
The rainwater collection system is broken at the environmental research station on a remote, rocky Pacific island off the California coast. So is a crane used to hoist small boats in and out of the water. A two-year supply of diesel fuel for the power generators is almost gone. U.S. Fish and...
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Anthony Spencer, whose wife, Chastity, right, is a furloughed federal worker, holds his daughter, Sydney, as they wait in line with others who are affected by the partial government shutdown for Philabundance volunteers to distribute food under Interstate 95 in Philadelphia, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
January 24, 2019 - 12:02 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — At this time of year, John Sprinkle and his wife would normally be planning their summer vacation. Not now. Sprinkle, a furloughed federal employee, is about to miss his second paycheck since the partial government shutdown began just before Christmas. With no end in sight to the...
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In this June 5, 2013 photo, some of the hundreds of mustangs the U.S. Bureau of Land Management removed from federal rangeland peer at visitors at the BLM's Palomino Valley holding facility about 20 miles north of Reno in Palomino Valley, Nev. The U.S. Forest Service has built a corral in California that could allow it to bypass federal restrictions and lead to the slaughter of wild horses. The agency acknowledged in court filings in a potentially precedent-setting legal battle that it built the new pen for mustangs gathered in the fall on national forest land along the California-Nevada line because horses held at other federal facilities cannot be sold for slaughter. (AP Photo/Scott Sonner)
January 15, 2019 - 4:59 pm
RENO, Nev. (AP) — The U.S. Forest Service has built a new corral for wild horses in Northern California, which could allow it to bypass federal restrictions and sell the animals for slaughter. The agency acknowledged in court filings in a potentially precedent-setting legal battle that it built the...
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