Political corruption

FILE - In this Oct. 2, 2019, file photo State Department Inspector General Steve Linick leaves a meeting in a secure area at the Capitol in Washington. Linick irritated powerful Democrats and Republicans alike in his seven years as the independent watchdog investigating waste and mismanagement at the State Department. Still, he was stunned by a Friday night phone call saying President Donald Trump had fired him. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
June 03, 2020 - 11:17 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Ousted State Department Inspector General Steve Linick on Wednesday told members of three congressional committees that before he was abruptly fired, he was investigating Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s use of government resources as well as the secretary’s decision to approve a...
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Former Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein is sworn in before a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, June 3, 2020. (Jim Lo Scalzo/Pool via AP)
June 03, 2020 - 12:51 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Former Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein told lawmakers Wednesday that he would not have approved an FBI surveillance application for a former Trump campaign aide during the Russia investigation had he known at the time about the problems that have since been revealed...
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FILE - This file photo combo shows, from left, Baltimore Mayor Bernard "Jack" Young, Sheila Dixon, Thiru Vignarajah, Mary Miller and Brandon Scott. Maryland residents are going to the polls and returning mail-in ballots for the state’s primary, and the highest-profile race Tuesday, June 2, 2020, is the Democratic contest to be the nominee for Baltimore’s mayor. (AP Photo/The Baltimore Sun via AP, File)
June 02, 2020 - 12:01 am
BALTIMORE (AP) — Maryland residents are going to the polls and returning mail-in ballots for the state’s primary, and the highest-profile race Tuesday is the Democratic contest to be the nominee for Baltimore’s mayor. The winner of that race in Maryland’s largest city will likely become mayor...
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FILE - In this Dec. 10, 2014, file photo Steve Linick, State Department Inspector General, testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. A senior department official said President Donald Trump removed Linick from his job as State Department’s inspector general on Friday, May 15, 2020, but gave no reason for his ouster. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
May 30, 2020 - 8:14 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Members of three House and Senate committees will interview former State Department Inspector General Steve Linick on Wednesday as part of an investigation by House Democrats into his abrupt firing by President Donald Trump. Linick will speak to members of the House Foreign...
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FILE - In this Oct. 2, 2019, file photo State Department Inspector General Steve Linick leaves a meeting in a secure area at the Capitol in Washington. A senior department official said President Donald Trump removed Linick from his job as State Department’s inspector general on Friday, May 15, 2020, but gave no reason for his ouster. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
May 29, 2020 - 4:16 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats announced Friday that they are expanding their investigation into the firing of State Department Inspector General Steve Linick, part of an effort to find out more about President Donald Trump’s moves to sideline several independent government watchdogs. The Democrats...
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This photo combo shows, from left, Baltimore Mayor Bernard "Jack" Young, Sheila Dixon, Thiru Vignarajah, Mary Miller and Brandon Scott Voters on Tuesday, June 2, 2020 will choose a mayor based on an ability to rein in violent crime, address entrenched poverty and restore steadily eroding trust in local government. (AP Photo/The Baltimore Sun via AP)
May 29, 2020 - 2:14 pm
BALTIMORE (AP) — Baltimore’s most consequential election in a generation is set to take place next week, when voters will be looking for a leader who can rein in violent crime, address entrenched poverty and restore steadily eroding trust in local government. Although Tuesday's election is a...
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FILE - This 2018 portrait released by the U.S. Department of Justice shows Connecticut's U.S. Attorney John Durham. Attorney General William Barr says he doesn't expect a criminal inquiry into the origins of the Russia investigation to target former President Barack Obama or Joe Biden, the former vice president and President Donald Trump's Democratic opponent this summer. But that doesn't mean the investigation, led by Durham, doesn't carry its own political consequences. (U.S. Department of Justice via AP, File)
May 27, 2020 - 9:46 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Attorney General William Barr says he doesn't expect a criminal inquiry into the origins of the Russia investigation to target former President Barack Obama or Joe Biden, the former vice president and President Donald Trump's Democratic opponent. But that doesn't mean the...
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May 27, 2020 - 3:33 pm
A federal appeals court on Wednesday upheld the dismissal of a lawsuit that accused Twitter, Facebook and other tech giants of conspiring to stifle the political views of a far-right activist and a conservative nonprofit. A three-judge panel from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of...
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FILE - In this Oct. 2, 2019, file photo State Department Inspector General Steve Linick leaves a meeting in a secure area at the Capitol in Washington. A senior department official said President Donald Trump removed Linick from his job as State Department’s inspector general on Friday, May 15, 2020, but gave no reason for his ouster. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
May 27, 2020 - 10:32 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump followed the law when he fired multiple inspectors general in the last two months, the White House has told Congress, but the administration offered no new details about why the internal watchdogs were let go. A White House letter issued Tuesday in response...
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White House counsel Pat Cipollone listens as President Donald Trump speaks during a coronavirus task force briefing in the Rose Garden of the White House, Sunday, March 29, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
May 27, 2020 - 4:35 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House said that President Donald Trump followed the law when he fired multiple inspectors general in the last two months, but the administration offered no new details about why they were let go. A White House letter issued Tuesday in response to concerns from a...
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