Premature births

October 07, 2019 - 2:18 pm
DANVILLE, Pa. (AP) — A Pennsylvania hospital is racing to determine the source of a waterborne germ that appears to have infected at least eight infants in the neonatal intensive care unit, three of whom have died, officials said Monday. Geisinger Medical Center in Danville has begun sending very...
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FILE - In this Saturday, June 23, 2018, file photo, a U.S. Border Patrol Agent walks between vehicles outside the Central Processing Center in McAllen, Texas. Advocates were shocked to find an underage mom and her tiny, premature newborn daughter huddled in a Border Patrol facility the second week of June 2019, in what they say was another example of the poor treatment immigrant families receive after crossing the border. The mother is a Guatemalan teen who crossed the border without a parent and was held at a facility in McAllen, Texas, with other families with children. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)
June 15, 2019 - 6:05 pm
A U.S. Border Patrol facility in Texas came under new scrutiny Saturday after a teenage mother was found there with a premature baby. Immigrant advocates expected the facility in the U.S.-Mexico border city of McAllen to allow doctors inside to conduct health assessments, but it was not immediately...
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FILE - In this Saturday, June 23, 2018, file photo, a U.S. Border Patrol Agent walks between vehicles outside the Central Processing Center in McAllen, Texas. Advocates were shocked to find an underage mom and her tiny, premature newborn daughter huddled in a Border Patrol facility the second week of June 2019, in what they say was another example of the poor treatment immigrant families receive after crossing the border. The mother is a Guatemalan teen who crossed the border without a parent and was held at a facility in McAllen, Texas, with other families with children. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)
June 15, 2019 - 2:50 am
The teenage girl with pigtail braids was hunched over in a wheelchair and holding a bunched sweatshirt when an immigrant advocate met her at a crowded Border Patrol facility in Texas. She opened the sweatshirt and the advocate gasped. It was a tiny baby, born premature and held in detention instead...
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This March, 2019 photo provided by Sharp HealthCare in San Diego shows a baby named Saybie. Sharp Mary Birch Hospital for Women & Newborns said in a statement Wednesday, May 29, 2019, that Saybie, born at 23 weeks and three days, is believed to be the world's tiniest surviving baby, who weighed just 245 grams (about 8.6 ounces) before she was discharged as a healthy infant. She was sent home this month weighing 5 pounds (2 kilograms) after nearly five months in the hospital's neonatal intensive care unit. (Sharp HealthCare via AP)
May 29, 2019 - 8:57 pm
SAN DIEGO (AP) — When she was born, the baby girl weighed about the same as an apple. A San Diego hospital on Wednesday revealed the birth of the girl and said she is believed to be the world's tiniest surviving micro-preemie, who weighed just 8.6 ounces (245 grams) when she was born in December...
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CORRECTS SPELLING OF LAST NAME TO MOREL INSTEAD OF MORELL - In this Jan. 29, 2019, photo provided by Mountain Area Health Education Center, from left, Hayley Heninger, Morgan Shirley and Kailee Morel Alvarez share their pregnancy experiences during a two-hour group prenatal session at Mountain Area Health Education Center in Asheville, N.C. Patients do their own blood pressure and weight checks and get a support group-style experience at the monthly sessions. Some studies have found fewer preterm births and more breastfeeding among women who participate compared with conventional individual visits. (Brenda Benik via AP)
April 25, 2019 - 9:25 am
ASHEVILLE, N.C. (AP) — In a big room full of moms-to-be, pregnant women check each other's blood pressure and weight, a nurse-midwife measures their growing bellies, and they all join a seated circle for two hours of candid talk about what to expect when you're expecting. A young woman's revelation...
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This 2019 photo provided by Northwestern University shows a soft, flexible wireless sensor applied on a foot of a family's baby, who is involved in the clinical trial at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago. This kind of sensor could replace the tangle of wire-based sensors that currently monitor babies in hospitals' neonatal intensive care units. (Northwestern University via AP)
February 28, 2019 - 1:52 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Peek into any U.S. hospital's baby ICU, and you'll see sick and premature newborns covered in wired monitors that tear at fragile skin and make it hard for parents to cuddle their kids. Now researchers have created tiny skin-like wireless sensors that may finally cut those cords...
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