Sexual and reproductive health

German Economic Cooperation and Development Minister Gerd Mueller, left, and Natalia Kanem, head of the U.N. population agency, present the annual report in Berlin, Germany, Wednesday, April 10, 2019. Kanem said that more than half the $70 million Washington used to give the agency annually was used for life-saving humanitarian programs. (Wolfgang Kumm/dpa via AP)
April 10, 2019 - 9:27 am
BERLIN (AP) — The U.N. population agency chief said Wednesday she regrets the U.S. government's decision to cut funding for programs that help ensure safe pregnancies worldwide. The United States used to provide about $70 million per year toward UNFPA programs to protect the health and lives of...
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FILE - In this July 10, 2018 file photo, protesters hold signs supporting Planned Parenthood in Seattle, as they demonstrate against President Donald Trump and his choice of federal appeals Judge Brett Kavanaugh as his second nominee to the Supreme Court. On Tuesday, March 5, 2019, the American Medical Association and Planned Parenthood jointly filed a federal court lawsuit challenging a new Trump administration rule for family-planning grants which had been sought by anti-abortion activists. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
March 05, 2019 - 5:49 pm
A new Trump administration rule for family-planning grants could trigger a national public health crisis, the American Medical Association and Planned Parenthood said in a lawsuit Tuesday challenging the rule. The new rule, announced last week by the Department of Health and Human Services, would...
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This undated photo provided by the U.S. Military Academy at West Point shows West Point Cadet Peter Zhu who died on Feb. 28, 2019 of injuries he sustained while skiing on Feb. 23 at Victor Constant Ski Area on the academy grounds. The parents of Peter Zhu have received a judge's permission to retrieve his sperm for possible artificial insemination. (U.S. Military Academy at West Point via AP)
March 04, 2019 - 9:14 pm
WEST POINT, N.Y. (AP) — The parents of a 21-year-old West Point cadet fatally injured in a skiing accident raced the clock to get a judge's permission to retrieve his sperm for "the possibility of preserving some piece of our child that might live on." U.S. Military Academy Cadet Peter Zhu was...
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This 2019 photo provided by Northwestern University shows a soft, flexible wireless sensor applied on a foot of a family's baby, who is involved in the clinical trial at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago. This kind of sensor could replace the tangle of wire-based sensors that currently monitor babies in hospitals' neonatal intensive care units. (Northwestern University via AP)
February 28, 2019 - 1:52 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Peek into any U.S. hospital's baby ICU, and you'll see sick and premature newborns covered in wired monitors that tear at fragile skin and make it hard for parents to cuddle their kids. Now researchers have created tiny skin-like wireless sensors that may finally cut those cords...
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February 22, 2019 - 6:10 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration on Friday set up new obstacles for women seeking abortions, barring taxpayer-funded family planning clinics from making abortion referrals. The new policy is certain to be challenged in court. The final rule released Friday by the Health and Human Services...
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February 22, 2019 - 12:31 pm
A small but haunting scene in the Oscar-nominated film "Roma" puts a rare spotlight on stillbirths. Nearly half a century after the film's setting, stillbirths are still surprisingly common, poorly understood and an often avoided topic. But scientists are finding new clues to their causes. And with...
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February 12, 2019 - 10:07 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Doctors already are supposed to screen new mothers for depression, to find those who need prompt care. Now they're also being urged to identify women at risk — because counseling could prevent depression from setting in. Up to 1 in 7 women experience what's called perinatal...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, April 17, 2018, file photo, Dr. Bernadith Russell hugs a friend as the statue of Dr. J. Marion Sims, is removed from New York's Central Park. Sims was known as the father of modern gynecology, but critics say his use of enslaved African-American women as experimental subjects was unethical. Russell, a gynecologist, said at the time she was in medical school, "He was held up as the father of gynecology with no acknowledgement of the enslaved women he experimented on." (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)
February 06, 2019 - 11:58 am
NEW YORK (AP) — The racist photo on Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam's yearbook page wasn't the only thing that disgusted Monifa Bandele. She was especially appalled that the image was published as he was graduating from medical school on his way to becoming a pediatrician. The 1984 photo has stirred a...
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FILE - In this July 19, 2007 file photo, Nobel Prize-winning scientist Craig Mello, front, acknowledges applause from members of the Massachusetts House and Senate on the floor of the House Chamber at the Statehouse in Boston. Emails obtained by The Associated Press show Chinese scientist He Jiankui told Mello about the gene-edited babies in April 2018, months before the claim became public. Mello objected to the experiment and remained an adviser to He's biotech company for eight more months before resigning. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)
January 28, 2019 - 11:06 am
Long before the claim of the world's first gene-edited babies became public, Chinese researcher He Jiankui shared the news with a U.S. Nobel laureate who objected to the experiment yet remained an adviser to He's biotech company. The revelation that another prominent scientist knew of the work,...
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FILE - In this March 25, 2015 file photo, Margot Riphagen of New Orleans, La., wears a birth control pills costume during a protest in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington. A U.S. judge will hear arguments Friday, Jan. 11, 2019, over California's attempt to block new rules by the Trump administration that would allow more employers to opt out of providing no-cost birth control to women. The new rules are set to go into effect on Monday, Jan. 14, 2019. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)
January 14, 2019 - 5:27 pm
HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — A federal judge on Monday put a nationwide hold on Trump administration rules that allow more employers to opt out of providing women with no-cost birth control. U.S. District Judge Wendy Beetlestone in Philadelphia agreed with a lawsuit originally filed by Pennsylvania,...
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