Synthetic drugs

FILE - This undated file image provided by the Maryland U.S. District Attorney's Office shows a photo of firearms and ammunition that was in the motion for detention pending trial in the case against Christopher Hasson. The Coast Guard lieutenant accused of stockpiling guns and drawing up a hist list of prominent Democrats and TV journalists is scheduled to be sentenced on Friday, Jan. 31, 2020 for his guilty plea to firearms and drug offenses. (Maryland U.S. District Attorney's Office via AP, File)
January 31, 2020 - 7:11 pm
GREENBELT, Md. (AP) — A Coast Guard lieutenant accused by prosecutors of being a domestic terrorist intent on committing politically motivated killings inspired by a far-right mass murderer was sentenced Friday to more than 13 years in prison for firearms and drug offenses. Christopher Hasson, 50,...
Read More
January 31, 2020 - 2:51 pm
DANNEMORA, N.Y. (AP) — Employees at a maximum security New York prison fell ill Friday after a letter was opened that contained a substance believed to be fentanyl, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said. Eleven people were taken to a hospital from the Clinton Correctional Facility Annex in Dannemora, New York...
Read More
FILE - In this June 5, 2019 file photo former critical care doctor William Husel, center, pleads not guilty to murder charges while appearing with defense attorney Richard Blake, right, in Franklin County Court in Columbus, Ohio. This week marks a year since an Ohio hospital system announced a doctor ordered excessive painkillers for dozens of patients who then died. William Husel pleaded not guilty to murder charges in the deaths of 25 patients in the Columbus-area Mount Carmel Health System. (AP Photo/Kantele Franko, File)
January 31, 2020 - 1:17 pm
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Defending an Ohio doctor charged with murder in the deaths of 25 patients will involve educating jurors about medical complexities and hard-to-pronounce pharmaceuticals, but it's really “a very simple case" about hospital employees caring for people who were on life support...
Read More
ADDS DATE AND LOCATION - This Sept. 29, 2018, photo provided by Garrett Hade shows shows Hade at Recovery Fest in Pawtucket, R.I., hosted by the Above The Noise Foundation. Hade said he has been sober for nearly five years after a long odyssey through addiction that began with OxyContin when he was a teenager in Florida. As an organizer with the Recovery Advocacy Project, Hade said he's telling people that they'll be able to make claims against Purdue Pharma. (Garrett Hade via AP)
January 24, 2020 - 3:37 pm
State and local governments have been leading the legal fight against the opioid industry, seeking payouts to help them deal with the fallout from the nation's addiction crisis. Average Americans are about to get their shot. On Friday, the federal judge overseeing the bankruptcy case of Purdue...
Read More
Insys Therapeutics founder John Kapoor, center, departs federal court Thursday, Jan. 23, 2020, in Boston, after he was sentenced to 5 1/2 years in prison for orchestrating a bribery and kickback scheme prosecutors said helped fuel the opioid crisis. He was found guilty the previous May of racketeering and conspiracy in a scheme where millions of dollars in bribes were paid to doctors across the United States to prescribe the company's highly addictive oral fentanyl spray, known as Subsys. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
January 23, 2020 - 7:21 pm
BOSTON (AP) — The founder of an Arizona pharmaceutical company was ordered to spend 5 1/2 years in prison Thursday for orchestrating a bribery and kickback scheme prosecutors said helped fuel the opioid crisis. John Kapoor, 76, the former chairman of Insys Therapeutics, was sentenced in Boston's...
Read More
January 23, 2020 - 2:55 am
HARARE, Zimbabwe (AP) — A billionaire has offered to pay striking doctors in Zimbabwe to help end a months-long protest over grave hospital conditions as the economy crumbles, and a doctors' group on Thursday said it was encouraging members to embrace the money and return to work. But Dr. Masimba...
Read More
FILE - In this Aug. 29, 2019, file photo, members of the Coast Guard stand near seized cocaine in Los Angeles. The nation's drug addiction crisis has been morphing in a deadly new direction: more Americans struggling with meth and cocaine. Now the government will allow states to use federal money earmarked of the opioid crisis to help people addicted to those drugs as well. The change to a $1.5 billion opioid grants program was buried in a massive spending bill that Congress passed late in 2019. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson, file)
Associated Press
January 21, 2020 - 12:33 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Alarmed by a deadly new twist in the nation's drug addiction crisis, the government will allow states to use federal money earmarked for the opioid epidemic to help growing numbers of people struggling with meth and cocaine. The little-noticed change is buried in a massive...
Read More
FILE - In this Thursday, Sept. 12, 2019 file photo, a police officer holds a box of Narcan, a drug used to treat opioid overdoses, that the department officers carry in their patrol vehicles in Jackson Township, Butler County, Pa. More companies could begin making the easy-to-use version of the medication under a deal announced Thursday, Jan. 2, 2020 by New York's attorney general. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)
January 02, 2020 - 11:30 am
NEW YORK (AP) — More companies could begin making an easy-to-use version of an opioid overdose antidote under a deal announced Thursday by New York's attorney general. Under the agreement, Emergent BioSolutions will no longer enforce a contract that had allowed it to be the only company to sell...
Read More
FILE - In this Aug. 7, 2019, file photo, Rep. Elijah Cummings, D-Md., speaks during a luncheon at the National Press Club in Washington. Cummings died from complications of longtime health challenges, his office said in a statement on Oct. 17, 2019. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)
Associated Press
December 31, 2019 - 7:43 pm
A lauded writer who brought to light stories overshadowed by prejudice. An actress and singer who helped embody the manufactured innocence of the 1950s. A self-made billionaire who rose from a childhood of Depression-era poverty and twice ran for president. This year saw the deaths of people who...
Read More
FILE - In this June 5, 2019 file photo former critical care doctor William Husel, center, pleads not guilty to murder charges while appearing with defense attorney Richard Blake, right, in Franklin County Court in Columbus, Ohio. Nusel, facing 25 counts of murder for his role in the deaths of hospital patients said in a defamation lawsuit filed against the hospital system he worked for that he did nothing wrong and did not deviate from hospital policy in providing end-of-life care. Husel filed the lawsuit Thursday, Dec. 26 in Franklin County, which includes Ohio's capital city of Columbus.(AP Photo/Kantele Franko, File)
December 28, 2019 - 12:35 pm
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — An Ohio doctor accused of ordering drug overdoses in the deaths of 25 hospital patients has sued his former employer for defamation, saying in a lawsuit that he did nothing wrong and did not deviate from hospital policy on end-of-life care. Dr. William Husel, who is accused of...
Read More

Pages