Water management

Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Andrew Wheeler, right, signs a document in front of Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works R.D. James to revoke the Waters of the United States rule, an Obama-era regulation that provided federal protection to many U.S. wetlands and streams, Thursday, Sept. 12, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
September 12, 2019 - 10:49 pm
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — The Latest on the Trump administration's plans to revoke an Obama-era clean water rule (all times local): 12:15 p.m. The Trump administration says revoking an Obama-era rule on waters and wetlands would provide "much-needed regulatory certainty" for farmers, homebuilders...
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Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Andrew Wheeler, right, signs a document in front of Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works R.D. James to revoke the Waters of the United States rule, an Obama-era regulation that provided federal protection to many U.S. wetlands and streams, Thursday, Sept. 12, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
September 12, 2019 - 4:57 pm
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — The Trump administration on Thursday revoked an Obama-era regulation that shielded many U.S. wetlands and streams from pollution but was opposed by developers and farmers who said it hurt economic development and infringed on property rights. Environmental groups...
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In this Thursday Aug. 15, 2019 photo, dairy farmer Fred Stone pauses while working in the milking room at his farm in Arundel, Maine. Fred Stone and his wife Laura, whose dairy farm is contaminated by toxic chemicals known collectively as PFAS, so-called "forever chemicals," have high PFAS levels in their blood. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)
September 12, 2019 - 11:29 am
LAPEER, Mich. (AP) — For more than 20 years, the eastern Michigan town of Lapeer sent leftover sludge from its sewage treatment plant to area farms, supplying them with high-quality, free fertilizer while avoiding the expense of disposal elsewhere. But state inspectors ordered a halt to the...
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FILE - In this June 15, 2009, file photo, T. Boone Pickens, president of BP Capital Group, speaks at Time Warner's headquarters in New York. Pickens, a brash and quotable oil tycoon who grew even wealthier through corporate takeover attempts, died Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2019. He was 91. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)
September 11, 2019 - 2:50 pm
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — T. Boone Pickens, a brash and quotable oil tycoon who grew even wealthier through corporate takeover attempts, died Wednesday. He was 91. Pickens was surrounded by friends and family when he died of natural causes under hospice care at his Dallas home, spokesman Jay Rosser said...
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A boat sits grounded in the aftermath of Hurricane Dorian, in Marsh Harbor, Abaco Island, Bahamas, Friday, Sept. 6, 2019. The Bahamian health ministry said helicopters and boats are on the way to help people in affected areas, though officials warned of delays because of severe flooding and limited access. (AP Photo/Gonzalo Gaudenzi)
September 06, 2019 - 10:00 pm
WILMINGTON, N.C. (AP) — The Latest on Hurricane Dorian (all times local): 11 p.m. Hurricane Dorian is speeding up toward eastern Canada. In an 11 p.m. Friday advisory, the National Hurricane Center says Dorian is about 200 miles (322 kilometers) south of Nantucket, Massachusetts and traveling...
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A row of hearts, each with the name of a victim, adorn a growing memorial to those who died aboard the dive boat Conception, seen early Friday morning, Sept. 6, 2019 at the harbor in Santa Barbara, Calif. The Sept. 2 fire took the lives of 34 people on the ship off Santa Cruz Island off the Southern California coast near Santa Barbara (AP Photo/Stefanie Dazio)
September 06, 2019 - 6:13 pm
From a veteran water polo coach to a Singaporean data scientist, the passengers aboard the ill-fated Conception dive boat were linked by their love for the water. Here are the victims who have been identified so far from the deadly fire that engulfed the vessel, killing 34 people off California's...
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In this Thursday, Aug. 15, 2019, photo several dead fish float along the bank of Burns Ditch near the Portage Marina in Portage, Ind. Some beaches along northwestern Indiana's Lake Michigan shoreline are closed after authorities say a chemical spill in a tributary caused a fish kill. (John Luke/The Times via AP)
August 17, 2019 - 1:43 pm
PORTAGE, Ind. (AP) — A steel company apologized for a spill of cyanide and ammonia that led to a fish kill and prompted the closure of beaches along Lake Michigan. ArcelorMittal issued a statement Friday night saying it "apologizes and accepts responsibility for the incident from the Burns Harbor...
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Elaine Younger, 11, and Tahvion Williams, 14, right, load water in their family's van at the Newark Health Department in Newark, N.J., Wednesday, Aug. 14, 2019. Residents began picking up bottled water on Monday, days after elevated lead levels were found in homes where city-issued filters had been distributed months ago as part of an ongoing effort to combat contamination. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
August 15, 2019 - 5:48 pm
NEWARK, N.J. (AP) — New Jersey's largest city faced off in court Thursday against an environmental group seeking to force officials to expand the distribution of bottled water to more residents facing potentially high lead levels. The arguments in federal court came days after the U.S...
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FILE - In this Feb. 1, 2016 file photo, a bald eagle takes flight at the Museum of the Shenandaoh Valley in Winchester, Va. While once-endangered bald eagles are booming again in the Chesapeake Bay, the overall trajectory of endangered species and the federal act that protects them isn't so clearcut. (Scott Mason/The Winchester Star via AP, File)
August 12, 2019 - 5:28 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration moved on Monday to weaken how it applies the 45-year-old Endangered Species Act, ordering changes that critics said will speed the loss of animals and plants at a time of record global extinctions . The action, which expands the administration's rewrite of...
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In this Wednesday, July 17, 2019, photo, an Indian fixes bait for fish, sitting on the dried up bed of Red Hills lake, a 4,500-acre 19th-century reservoir, in Chennai, capital of the Southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu. In Chennai, a coastal city of about 10 million and the capital of Tamil Nadu state, rapid development and rampant construction have overtaxed a once-abundant natural water supply, forcing the government to spend huge sums to desalinate sea water, bring water by train from hundreds of kilometers (miles) away and deploy an army of water trucks to people whose household taps have suddenly run dry. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)
August 04, 2019 - 11:03 pm
CHENNAI, India (AP) — With dozens of billion-dollar companies and thousands of high-paying IT and manufacturing jobs, the southern Indian city of Chennai has one of the world's fastest-growing economies. But now it's running out of water, threatening to put a brake on all that growth. The shortfall...
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