Water pollution

In this April 8, 2019, photo, Tim Tanksley, who has been fighting for years trying to convince Oklahoma lawmakers to crack down on the coal ash dumping, stands outside a dump site in Bokoshe, Okla. President Donald Trump’s EPA has approved Oklahoma to be the first state to take over permitting and enforcement on coal-ash sites. “They’re going to do absolutely nothing,” Tanksley said. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
May 20, 2019 - 10:50 am
BOKOSHE, Okla. (AP) — Susan Holmes' home, corner store and roadside beef jerky stand are right off Oklahoma Highway 31, putting them in the path of trucks hauling ash and waste from a power plant that burns the high-sulfur coal mined near this small town. For years, when Bokoshe residents were...
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This Oct. 14, 2018, image provided by Tom Johnson shows campers along the shoreline of Lake Holloman at Holloman Air Force Base, New Mexico. The New Mexico attorney general's office on Thursday, May 9, 2019, requested that the U.S. Air Force close the lake to the public after sampling turned up high levels of hazardous chemicals. (Tom Johnson via AP)
May 09, 2019 - 10:38 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico's top prosecutor is demanding that the U.S. Air Force close a publicly accessible lake at Holloman Air Force Base, saying Thursday the concentration of hazardous chemicals at the site poses a risk to public health and the environment. In a letter obtained by The...
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An aerial shot shows widespread destruction caused by Cyclone Kenneth when it struck Ibo island north of Pemba city in Mozambique, Wednesday, May, 1, 2019. The government has said more than 40 people have died after the cyclone made landfall on Thursday, and the humanitarian situation in Pemba and other areas is dire. More than 22 inches (55 centimeters) of rain have fallen in Pemba since Kenneth arrived just six weeks after Cyclone Idai tore into central Mozambique. (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi)
May 02, 2019 - 2:33 pm
IBO ISLAND, Mozambique (AP) — Cyclone Kenneth in northern Mozambique ripped the island of Ibo apart. Nearly a week after the storm roared in, Associated Press journalists found widespread devastation. The aerial approach to the island showed communities flattened. The overwhelming majority of homes...
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April 11, 2019 - 6:18 am
MIAMI (AP) — A federal judge has threatened to temporarily block Carnival Corp. from docking cruise ships at ports in the United States as punishment for a possible probation violation. The Miami Herald reports U.S. District Judge Patricia Seitz said Wednesday that she'll make a decision in June,...
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April 04, 2019 - 10:51 am
MILAN (AP) — Italian explorer Alex Bellini plans to travel down the world's 10 most polluted rivers on make-shift rafts, tracing the routes of plastics that pollute the world's oceans. Bellini said Thursday that he was inspired by a 2018 study by a German scientist that found 80% of plastic in the...
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In this photo taken Thursday, March 28, 2019, Anne Vierra,with the town of Paradise, takes payment for the first building permit since the Camp Fire as Jason and Meagann Buzzard plan to rebuild their home in Paradise, Calif. Small signs of rebuilding a Northern California town destroyed by wildfire are sprouting this spring, including the issuing of the first permit to rebuild one of the 11,000 homes destroyed in Paradise five months ago. A city hall clerk on Thursday issued the couple a building permit to replace their home destroyed by the Nov. 8 fire that killed 85 people. The couple told reporters they never thought about leaving. Paradise Mayor Jody Jones said the Buzzards' permit is a sign that the town will rebuild.(Hector Amezcua/The Sacramento Bee via AP)
March 29, 2019 - 2:42 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Small signs of rebuilding the California town of Paradise after it was destroyed by wildfire are sprouting this spring, including the issuing of the first permits to rebuild two the 11,000 homes destroyed five months ago. The city issued the first permit Thursday to Jason and...
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Community members assist a doctor carrying boxes with medical supplies as he runs towards the South African Defence Forces helicopter after assisting a community affected by a cyclone near Beira, Mozambique, Thursday, March 28, 2019. The first cases of cholera have been confirmed in the cyclone-ravaged city of Beira, Mozambican authorities announced on Wednesday, raising the stakes in an already desperate fight to help hundreds of thousands of people sheltering in increasingly squalid conditions. (AP Photo/Themba Hadebe)
March 29, 2019 - 12:38 pm
JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Cholera cases in Mozambique among survivors of a devastating cyclone have shot up to 139, officials said, as nearly 1 million vaccine doses were rushed to the region and health workers desperately tried to improvise treatment space for victims. Cholera causes acute diarrhea, is...
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Larry Poell, who lives on top of a Superfund site in Mead, Neb., adjusts Wednesday, March 27, 2019, the overalls of his granddaughter, while visiting a flood relief shelter in Ashland. Poell said federal officials have always maintained that the contaminated plumes are stable, but he wonders if the floodwater caused them to shift. "I'm concerned about it, I think everybody's concerned about it," he said. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
March 28, 2019 - 1:22 pm
MEAD, Neb. (AP) — Flooding in the Midwest temporarily cut off a Superfund site in Nebraska that stores radioactive waste and explosives, inundated another one storing toxic chemical waste in Missouri, and limited access to others, according to federal regulators. The Environmental Protection Agency...
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March 25, 2019 - 2:02 pm
RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — In a story March 23 about the aftermath of a Brazilian dam collapse, The Associated Press reported erroneously that a new evacuation had been ordered for people near a dam. They had been evacuated in February. A corrected version of the story is below: Brazilian miner Vale...
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In this March 12, 2019 satellite photo provided by NOAA, shows the Great Lakes in various degrees of snow and ice. A scientific report says the Great Lakes region is warming faster than the rest of the U.S., which likely will bring more flooding and other extreme weather events such as heat waves and drought. The warming climate also could mean less overall snowfall even as lake-effect snowstorms get bigger. The report by researchers from universities primarily from the Midwest says agriculture could be hit especially hard, with later spring planting and summer dry spells. (NOAA via AP)
March 21, 2019 - 4:46 pm
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — The Great Lakes region is warming faster than the rest of the U.S., a trend likely to bring more extreme storms while also degrading water quality, worsening erosion and posing tougher challenges for farming, scientists reported Thursday. The annual mean air temperature...
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