Water pollution

Community members assist a doctor carrying boxes with medical supplies as he runs towards the South African Defence Forces helicopter after assisting a community affected by a cyclone near Beira, Mozambique, Thursday, March 28, 2019. The first cases of cholera have been confirmed in the cyclone-ravaged city of Beira, Mozambican authorities announced on Wednesday, raising the stakes in an already desperate fight to help hundreds of thousands of people sheltering in increasingly squalid conditions. (AP Photo/Themba Hadebe)
March 29, 2019 - 12:38 pm
JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Cholera cases in Mozambique among survivors of a devastating cyclone have shot up to 139, officials said, as nearly 1 million vaccine doses were rushed to the region and health workers desperately tried to improvise treatment space for victims. Cholera causes acute diarrhea, is...
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Larry Poell, who lives on top of a Superfund site in Mead, Neb., adjusts Wednesday, March 27, 2019, the overalls of his granddaughter, while visiting a flood relief shelter in Ashland. Poell said federal officials have always maintained that the contaminated plumes are stable, but he wonders if the floodwater caused them to shift. "I'm concerned about it, I think everybody's concerned about it," he said. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
March 28, 2019 - 1:22 pm
MEAD, Neb. (AP) — Flooding in the Midwest temporarily cut off a Superfund site in Nebraska that stores radioactive waste and explosives, inundated another one storing toxic chemical waste in Missouri, and limited access to others, according to federal regulators. The Environmental Protection Agency...
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March 25, 2019 - 2:02 pm
RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — In a story March 23 about the aftermath of a Brazilian dam collapse, The Associated Press reported erroneously that a new evacuation had been ordered for people near a dam. They had been evacuated in February. A corrected version of the story is below: Brazilian miner Vale...
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In this March 12, 2019 satellite photo provided by NOAA, shows the Great Lakes in various degrees of snow and ice. A scientific report says the Great Lakes region is warming faster than the rest of the U.S., which likely will bring more flooding and other extreme weather events such as heat waves and drought. The warming climate also could mean less overall snowfall even as lake-effect snowstorms get bigger. The report by researchers from universities primarily from the Midwest says agriculture could be hit especially hard, with later spring planting and summer dry spells. (NOAA via AP)
March 21, 2019 - 4:46 pm
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — The Great Lakes region is warming faster than the rest of the U.S., a trend likely to bring more extreme storms while also degrading water quality, worsening erosion and posing tougher challenges for farming, scientists reported Thursday. The annual mean air temperature...
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Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Environment Maureen Sullivan at a House Oversight and Reform subcommittee hearing on PFAS chemicals and their risks on Wednesday, March 6, 2019, on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Pentagon defends its handling and continued use of a toxic firefighting foam that it acknowledges has contaminated water around more than 400 military bases, as military families and officials from states testify on the health and financial tolls. (AP Photo/Sait Serkan Gurbuz)
March 20, 2019 - 11:05 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. Army has put a price tag on releasing the results of water tests for a dangerous contaminant at military installations: nearly $300,000. In a March 12 letter, the Army told the Environmental Working Group, an advocacy group, that the military would charge the group $290,...
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In this Thursday, March 14, 2019 photo, Belinda Lau, manager of the Wiki Wiki Drive Inn takeout restaurant in Honolulu, sprinkles cheese on an order of spaghetti in a styrofoam container. Hawaii would be the first state in the U.S. to ban most plastics used at restaurants under legislation that aims to cut down on waste that pollutes the ocean. Dozens of cities across the country have banned plastic foam containers, but Hawaii would be the first to bar them statewide. (AP Photo/Audrey McAvoy)
March 19, 2019 - 1:09 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — Hawaii would be the first state in the U.S. to ban most plastics at restaurants under legislation that aims to cut down on waste that pollutes the ocean. Dozens of cities across the country have banned plastic foam containers, but Hawaii's measure would make it the first state to do...
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FILE – In this July 12, 2011, file photo, two rowers paddle along the Cuyahoga River in Cleveland. Federal environmental regulators say fish living in the northeastern Ohio river that became synonymous with pollution when it caught fire in 1969 are now safe to eat. The easing of fish consumption restrictions on the Cuyahoga River was lauded by Republican Gov. Mike DeWine as progress achieved by investing in water quality. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File)
March 19, 2019 - 8:19 am
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Federal environmental regulators say fish living in an Ohio river that became synonymous with pollution when it caught fire in 1969 are now safe to eat. The easing of fish consumption restrictions on the Cuyahoga (ky-uh-HOH'-guh) River in northeast Ohio was lauded Monday by...
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March 15, 2019 - 5:13 pm
MERRIMACK, N.H. (AP) — Democratic presidential hopeful Kirsten Gillibrand is trying to connect with voters' important issues on the ground — or, in some cases, underground. The U.S. senator from New York held two roundtable discussions Friday in New Hampshire communities struggling with...
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An island of solar panels floats in a pond at the Los Bronces mining plant, about 65 kilometers (approximately 40 miles) from Santiago, Chile, Thursday, March 14, 2019. The island of solar panels could give purpose to mine refuse in Chile by using them to generate clean energy and reduce water evaporation.(AP Photo / Esteban Felix)
March 15, 2019 - 11:04 am
SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) — A floating island of solar panels is being tested in Chile as a way to generate clean energy and reduce water loss at mine operations, a cornerstone of the Andean country's economy that uses huge amounts of electricity and water. The experimental "Las Tortolas" power-...
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FILE - In this Monday, Sept. 4, 2017 file photo, pyres of ivory are set on fire in Nairobi National Park, Kenya. Kenya's president Saturday set fire to 105 tons of elephant ivory and more than 1 ton of rhino horn, believed to be the largest stockpile ever destroyed, in a dramatic statement against the trade in ivory and products from endangered species. According to a scientific report from the United Nations released on Wednesday, March 13, 2019, climate change, a global major extinction of animals and plants, a human population soaring toward 10 billion, degraded land, polluted air, and plastics, pesticides and hormone-changing chemicals in the water are making the planet an increasing unhealthy place for people. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
March 13, 2019 - 7:36 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Earth is sick with multiple and worsening environmental ills killing millions of people yearly, a new U.N. report says. Climate change, a global major extinction of animals and plants, a human population soaring toward 10 billion, degraded land, polluted air, and plastics,...
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