water quality

A child plays in a puddle at a camp for displaced survivors of cyclone Idai in Beira, Mozambique,Tuesday, April, 2, 2019. Mozambican and international health workers raced Monday to contain a cholera outbreak in the cyclone-hit city of Beira and surrounding areas, where the number of cases has jumped to more than 1,000. (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi)
April 02, 2019 - 10:17 am
BEIRA, Mozambique (AP) — Cholera cases in cyclone-hit Mozambique have risen above 1,400, government officials said Tuesday, as hundreds of thousands of vaccine doses arrived in an attempt to limit the rapid spread of the disease. Authorities announced a second death from cholera, which causes acute...
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Chinese doctors spray chemicals to prevent the spread of cholera at a camp for displaced survivors of Cyclone Idai in Beira, Mozambique, Sunday, March, 31, 2019. Cholera cases among cyclone survivors in Mozambique have jumped to 271, authorities said. So far no cholera deaths have been confirmed, the report said. Another Lusa report said the death toll in central Mozambique from the cyclone that hit on March 14 had inched up to 501. Authorities have warned the toll is highly preliminary as flood waters recede and reveal more bodies. (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi)
March 31, 2019 - 12:16 pm
BEIRA, Mozambique (AP) — As Mozambique battles to control a fast-spreading cholera outbreak in the cyclone-hit central city of Beira, international assistance is arriving. The number of cholera cases jumped to 271 over the weekend although no deaths from the disease had been reported. More than 500...
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A family builds a temporary structure after their house was destroyed, on the outskirts of Beira in Mozambique, Thursday, March 28, 2019. The first cases of cholera have been confirmed in the cyclone-ravaged city of Beira, Mozambican authorities announced on Wednesday, raising the stakes in an already desperate fight to help hundreds of thousands of people sheltering in increasingly squalid conditions. (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi)
March 30, 2019 - 6:15 am
JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Cholera cases among cyclone survivors in Mozambique have jumped to 271, authorities said, a figure that nearly doubled from the previous day. The Portuguese news agency Lusa cited national health director Ussein Isse, who declared the outbreak of the acute diarrheal disease on...
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In this photo taken Thursday, March 28, 2019, Anne Vierra,with the town of Paradise, takes payment for the first building permit since the Camp Fire as Jason and Meagann Buzzard plan to rebuild their home in Paradise, Calif. Small signs of rebuilding a Northern California town destroyed by wildfire are sprouting this spring, including the issuing of the first permit to rebuild one of the 11,000 homes destroyed in Paradise five months ago. A city hall clerk on Thursday issued the couple a building permit to replace their home destroyed by the Nov. 8 fire that killed 85 people. The couple told reporters they never thought about leaving. Paradise Mayor Jody Jones said the Buzzards' permit is a sign that the town will rebuild.(Hector Amezcua/The Sacramento Bee via AP)
March 29, 2019 - 2:42 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Small signs of rebuilding the California town of Paradise after it was destroyed by wildfire are sprouting this spring, including the issuing of the first permits to rebuild two the 11,000 homes destroyed five months ago. The city issued the first permit Thursday to Jason and...
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Community members assist a doctor carrying boxes with medical supplies as he runs towards the South African Defence Forces helicopter after assisting a community affected by a cyclone near Beira, Mozambique, Thursday, March 28, 2019. The first cases of cholera have been confirmed in the cyclone-ravaged city of Beira, Mozambican authorities announced on Wednesday, raising the stakes in an already desperate fight to help hundreds of thousands of people sheltering in increasingly squalid conditions. (AP Photo/Themba Hadebe)
March 29, 2019 - 12:38 pm
JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Cholera cases in Mozambique among survivors of a devastating cyclone have shot up to 139, officials said, as nearly 1 million vaccine doses were rushed to the region and health workers desperately tried to improvise treatment space for victims. Cholera causes acute diarrhea, is...
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Larry Poell, who lives on top of a Superfund site in Mead, Neb., adjusts Wednesday, March 27, 2019, the overalls of his granddaughter, while visiting a flood relief shelter in Ashland. Poell said federal officials have always maintained that the contaminated plumes are stable, but he wonders if the floodwater caused them to shift. "I'm concerned about it, I think everybody's concerned about it," he said. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
March 28, 2019 - 1:22 pm
MEAD, Neb. (AP) — Flooding in the Midwest temporarily cut off a Superfund site in Nebraska that stores radioactive waste and explosives, inundated another one storing toxic chemical waste in Missouri, and limited access to others, according to federal regulators. The Environmental Protection Agency...
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A family stand outside their submerged huts near Nhamatanda, about 130km from Beira, in Mozambique, Tuesday, March, 26, 2019. Relief operations pressed into remote areas of central Mozambique where an unknown number of people remain without aid more than 10 days after a cyclone ripped across the country, while trucks attempted to reach the hard-hit city of Beira on a badly damaged road. (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi)
March 26, 2019 - 1:43 pm
BEIRA, Mozambique (AP) — Cyclone-ravaged Mozambique faces a "second disaster" from cholera and other diseases, the World Health Organization warned on Tuesday, while relief operations pressed into rural areas where an unknown number of people remain without aid more than 10 days after the storm...
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March 25, 2019 - 2:02 pm
RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — In a story March 23 about the aftermath of a Brazilian dam collapse, The Associated Press reported erroneously that a new evacuation had been ordered for people near a dam. They had been evacuated in February. A corrected version of the story is below: Brazilian miner Vale...
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In this March 12, 2019 satellite photo provided by NOAA, shows the Great Lakes in various degrees of snow and ice. A scientific report says the Great Lakes region is warming faster than the rest of the U.S., which likely will bring more flooding and other extreme weather events such as heat waves and drought. The warming climate also could mean less overall snowfall even as lake-effect snowstorms get bigger. The report by researchers from universities primarily from the Midwest says agriculture could be hit especially hard, with later spring planting and summer dry spells. (NOAA via AP)
March 21, 2019 - 4:46 pm
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — The Great Lakes region is warming faster than the rest of the U.S., a trend likely to bring more extreme storms while also degrading water quality, worsening erosion and posing tougher challenges for farming, scientists reported Thursday. The annual mean air temperature...
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Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Environment Maureen Sullivan at a House Oversight and Reform subcommittee hearing on PFAS chemicals and their risks on Wednesday, March 6, 2019, on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Pentagon defends its handling and continued use of a toxic firefighting foam that it acknowledges has contaminated water around more than 400 military bases, as military families and officials from states testify on the health and financial tolls. (AP Photo/Sait Serkan Gurbuz)
March 20, 2019 - 11:05 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. Army has put a price tag on releasing the results of water tests for a dangerous contaminant at military installations: nearly $300,000. In a March 12 letter, the Army told the Environmental Working Group, an advocacy group, that the military would charge the group $290,...
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