Zero tolerance policy

Migrants traveling with children walk up a hill to a waiting U.S. Border Patrol agent just inside San Ysidro, Calif., after climbing over the border wall from Playas de Tijuana, Mexico, Monday, Dec. 3, 2018. Thousands of Central American migrants who traveled with recent caravans want to seek asylum in the United States but face a decision between crossing illegally or waiting months, because the U.S. government only processes a limited number of those cases a day at the San Ysidro border crossing. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
December 06, 2018 - 5:27 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration separated 81 migrant children from their families at the U.S.-Mexico border since the June executive order that stopped the general practice amid a crackdown on illegal crossings, according to government data obtained by The Associated Press. Despite the...
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FILE- In this June 18, 2018, file photo immigrant children play outside a former Job Corps site that now houses them in Homestead, Fla. In a Wednesday, Nov. 28, letter to the heads of the Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Homeland Security, 112 civil liberties and immigrant rights groups, child welfare advocates and privacy activists are crying foul, demanding an immediate halt to what they call an illegal practice. HHS and DHS are obtaining information from detained children on their U.S.-based relatives for reunification, the authors complain, and “using that data to find, arrest and deport those families.” Already, they write, “families have become too scared to step forward to sponsor children.” (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee, File)
November 28, 2018 - 5:44 am
Earlier this year, the federal agency tasked with caring for asylum-seeking children separated from their parents at the U.S.-Mexican border officially took on a new, little heralded role: helping to deport relatives of the young migrants. In a Wednesday letter to the heads of the Department of...
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In this Nov. 15, 2018 photo provided by Ivan Pierre Aguirre, migrant teens held inside the Tornillo detention camp look at protestors waving at them outside the fences surrounding the facility in Tornillo, Texas. The Trump administration announced in June 2018 that it would open the temporary shelter for up to 360 migrant children in this isolated corner of the Texas desert. Less than six months later, the facility has expanded into a detention camp holding thousands of teenagers - and it shows every sign of becoming more permanent. (Ivan Pierre Aguirre via AP)
November 27, 2018 - 2:46 pm
TORNILLO, Texas (AP) — The Trump administration announced in June it would open a temporary shelter for up to 360 migrant children in this isolated corner of the Texas desert. Less than six months later, the facility has expanded into a detention camp holding thousands of teenagers — and it shows...
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In this Nov. 15, 2018 photo provided by Ivan Pierre Aguirre, migrant teens are led in a line inside the Tornillo detention camp holding more than 2,300 migrant teens in Tornillo, Texas. The Trump administration announced in June 2018 that it would open the temporary shelter for up to 360 migrant children in this isolated corner of the Texas desert. Less than six months later, the facility has expanded into a detention camp holding thousands of teenagers - and it shows every sign of becoming more permanent. (Ivan Pierre Aguirre via AP)
November 27, 2018 - 12:41 pm
TORNILLO, Texas (AP) — The Trump administration announced in June it would open a temporary shelter for up to 360 migrant children in this isolated corner of the Texas desert. Less than six months later, the facility has expanded into a detention camp holding thousands of teenagers — and it shows...
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November 23, 2018 - 4:02 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — Half a dozen families who were separated at the U.S.-Mexico border are still detained in Texas months after reuniting with their children. Immigrant advocates say the government has violated a longstanding legal agreement that bars it from detaining children past 20 days in...
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Honduran migrant Jose Macy carries his four-year-old nephew Yair Perez as the thousands-strong caravan of Central Americans migrants hoping to reach the U.S. border moves onward from Juchitan, Oaxaca state, Mexico, Thursday, Nov. 1, 2018. Thousands of migrants resumed their slow trek through southern Mexico on Thursday, after attempts to obtain bus transport to Mexico City failed. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)
November 01, 2018 - 5:12 pm
TAPANETEPEC, Mexico (AP) — Toddlers slump in strollers bouncing across the rough asphalt, and infants only a few weeks old jiggle in their fathers' arms. Others, limp from exhaustion and nearly too big to be carried, are slung across their mothers' chests like sacks of grain, sweaty hair plastered...
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October 12, 2018 - 2:27 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — In a story Oct. 12 about immigrants in Arizona, The Associated Press reported erroneously the name of the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency. A corrected version of the story is below: Border officials alarmed by migrants abandoned in the desert Smugglers in recent weeks...
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FILE - In this July 31, 2018, file photo, then-Customs and Border Protection U.S. Border Patrol Acting Chief Carla Provost takes questions as the Senate Judiciary Committee holds a hearing on the Trump administration's policies on immigration enforcement and family reunification efforts, on Capitol Hill in Washington. For the first time in the 94-year history of the U.S. Border Patrol, a woman is in charge. Provost was named to the position in August 2018 after serving as acting chief since April 2017 (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
October 02, 2018 - 1:08 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Homeland Security's internal watchdog says immigration officials were not prepared to manage the consequences of its "zero tolerance" policy at the border this summer that resulted in the separation of nearly 3,000 children from parents. The report made public Tuesday found one...
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FILE - This undated file photo provided by HHS' Administration for Children and Families shows the shelter used to house unaccompanied foreign children in Tornillo, Texas. The U.S. government says the West Texas tent shelter will remain open through the end of the year. A spokesman for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services said Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018, that the facility will be expanded to 3,800 beds from its initial capacity of 360 beds. (HHS' Administration for Children and Families via AP, File)
September 11, 2018 - 9:54 pm
HOUSTON (AP) — The U.S. government will expand its tent shelter for immigrant minors crossing the southwest border to 3,800 beds and keep it open through the end of this year, an agency spokesman said Tuesday. The facility at Tornillo, Texas, which originally opened with a 360-bed capacity for 30...
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U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights Chilean Michelle Bachelet addresses her statement during the opening of 39th session of the Human Rights Council, at the European headquarters of the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland, Monday, Sept. 10, 2018. (Salvatore Di Nolfi/Keystone via AP)
September 10, 2018 - 4:37 am
GENEVA (AP) — The new U.N. human rights chief warned Monday about abuses worldwide, citing among others the Trump administration's "unconscionable" separations of migrant families and urging the European Union to create a dedicated search and rescue operation for migrants in the Mediterranean sea...
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